International Environment Forum - A Bahá'í inspired organization for environment and sustainability http://iefworld.org/rss.xml en UN Environment and Faith-Based Organizations http://iefworld.org/node/900 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">UN Environment and Faith-Based Organizations</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Arthur Dahl</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">6. December 2017 - 23:56</span> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/110" hreflang="en">UNEP</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/69" hreflang="en">Religion</a></div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">UN Environment and Faith-Based Organizations</h2> <p>Report by Arthur Dahl</p> </div> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <p>As part of a United Nations-wide effort to strengthen its relationship with religions, led by a UN Task Force on Religion and Development, UN Environment (formerly UNEP) is developing a <b>Strategy for Engaging with Faith-Based Organizations</b>. To help it finalize the strategy, UN Environment organized a <b>Consultation meeting on Engaging with Faith-Based Organizations</b> in Nairobi, Kenya, on 30 November 2017, among the events around the 3rd UN Environment Assembly. Participants represented Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, Bahá’í, Judaism, Hinduism, Spirituality and interfaith organizations, and global, national and local perspectives. The International Environment Forum (IEF) was invited to represent the Bahá’í Faith, with Arthur Dahl as the IEF participant.</p> <p><img alt="UN Office in Nairobi" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/Nairobi171130_16.jpg" />&nbsp;<img alt="UN Office in Nairobi" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/Nairobi171130_19.jpg" /><br /> <small>UN Office in Nairobi</small></p> <p>The purpose of the meeting was to agree on the Strategy objectives and activities; identify top priority environmental issues of mutual focus; map global, regional and local environmental Faith-Based Organizations (FBOs); identify existing Knowledge management tools and networks; share existing experience and involvement; identify faith-based investment entities; and make commitments of specific support. Each organization replied to a detailed questionnaire on these topics, and also made a short presentation during the meeting.</p> <p>The UN Environment Strategy for Engaging with Faith-Based Organizations aims to inspire, empower and engage with Faith-based Organizations to innovatively deliver on the Sustainable Development Goals and Agenda 2030 at all levels. The strategy has three major goals:<br /> 1: Strengthen Partnerships with Faith-Based Organizations’ Leadership for Policy Impact<br /> 2: Green Faith-Based organization’s assets and transform Financing the SDGs<br /> 3: Science-Faith-Based Evidence<br /> It includes detailed lists of outputs and corresponding activities for each goal. It is intended that the initiative should be directly linked to the Office of the Executive Director in the Division of Policy and Programming, with an advisory committee representing major faith-based organizations and religions to provide guidance and direction.</p> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">The consultation</h3> <p>The meeting was opened by Erik Solheim, Executive Director of UN Environment, after which Dr. Iyad Abumoghli, Principal Advisor to UN Environment on Strategic Engagement with Faith-Based Organizations, summarized the proposed strategy, and Alexander Juras, who heads the Major Groups and Stakeholders Unit, described synergies between these groups and UN Environment.</p> <p><img alt="Iyad Abumoghli" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/Nairobi171130_12.jpg" />&nbsp;<img alt="FBO representative" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/Nairobi171130_2.jpg" /><br /> <small>Dr. Iyad Abumoghli; FBO participants in the consultation</small></p> <p>The head of the <b>UN Task Force on Religion and Development</b>, Dr. Azza Karam, made a presentation by video link on the experience of the Task Force. The Task Force began functioning informally in 2007, and was formalized as part of the UN Development Group in 2010. Its members represent 17 UN system entities involved in development, peace and security, and human rights. Its objectives are to:<br /> - Seek information, scientific knowledge and secure sharing thereof around religion, religious groups and religious engagement (research, policy roundtables);<br /> - Build internal UN system capacities around religion, religious groups and religious engagement (strategic learning exchanges/trainings, database of interfaith networks);<br /> - Advocate/advise on religion, religious groups and religious engagement at intergovernmental gatherings (functional commissions, High Level Political Forum, UNGA);<br /> - Provide policy guidance/advice to UN management (World Humanitarian Summit);<br /> - Serve as a UN-portal for FBOs to access more information and knowledge and enhance partnerships with UN system entities (UN NGO committees, etc.).<br /> Some of its achievements include countering narratives of violent extremism, expanding and innovating in the way we do development, supporting environmental protection and stewardship (with UN Environment, Yale University Environmental Network and WWF), countering harmful human rights practices perpetuated in the name of religion, ensuring freedom of religion and belief and protection of religious minorities, defining decent work, and supporting informed religious knowledge for women’s empowerment and gender equality. The task force has acquired a lot of experience on what to do and not to do in dealing with faith-based organizations.</p> <p>Many of the organizations present shared their experiences on environmental stewardship, ranging from running international universities to national networks and local community activities. The IEF described the long involvement of the Bahá’í International Community with the United Nations, and its environmental engagement starting at the 1972 Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment, and continuing with the Rio Earth Summit in 1992, the World Summit on Sustainable Development (2002) and Rio+20 in 2012, with at least 36 statements on issues relevant to the environment and sustainability. It then explained the role of IEF as a Bahá’í-inspired professional organization for the environment and sustainability, accredited by the UN in the science and technology major group, maintaining web resources, designing interfaith courses, organizing annual conferences and side events at UN conferences, producing a monthly newsletter, and partnering in other networks. It also mentioned another Bahá’í-inspired organization, ebbf-Ethical Business Building the Future, that encourages sustainability in business and the workplace.</p> <p><img alt="FBO representatives" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/Nairobi171130_6.jpg" />&nbsp;<img alt="UN Office in Nairobi" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/Nairobi171130_14.jpg" /><br /> <small>FBO participants in the consultation; UN Office in Nairobi</small></p> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Summary of reflections by Faith-Based Organizations</h3> <p>There was then an open consultation with FBOs on the UN Environment Strategy, looking for concrete suggestions on leadership, investment, and science, knowledge and communications, summarized as follows.</p> <p>The groups called for a forum or platform to exchange experience, and to post resources to, and UN Environment said it will open a page on its web site for this. There needs to be a network of networks to assemble existing resources and best practices. It could also include reports on faith-environment events; annual events and a calendar of future events could be listed. For materials in other languages, it would be helpful to have a title or summary in English. Many things are happening in FBOs, but they are not getting out, so there is a need to let the world know. It should become a community of practice to keep sharing.</p> <p>FBOs are well placed to explore the root causes of environmental problems, and to express the values that speak to the heart. The FBOs could help to move to transformational impacts, with a big message to impact from the global level. They could help to find win-win solutions. They need to discuss what they can do together to have lasting transformational impact, exploring core issues like human purpose. What makes humans human, and not just machines? They should inspire soul-searching; Who am I? Faith communities have another time-line, a long-term perspective, such as the First Nations in North America considering 7 generations. This will be an important contribution to UN Environment.</p> <p>It is important to include youth in faith dialogues, and to build on their use of technologies. This should include activities on the ground for practical applications. Everything today is expressed and valued in economic terms, and this is driving the world in unsustainable directions. Faith-based groups should advocate for alternatives.</p> <p>Pollution and food waste were proposed as specific areas of focus for global impact. Pollution is the theme of UNEA 3, so FBOs could support implementation of its outcomes. The theme of the next UNEA in 2019 has not yet been decided, but could become an area of focus. The UNEA should have resolutions including the ethical dimension.</p> <p>There was agreement that the initial focus could be on three priority environmental issues: pollution, water, and waste reduction and management. Water has an important symbolism in many religions that could be built on. These could be issues around which to build faith-based messages. What in scriptures would reinforce the messages of UNEA? FBOs could reflect on their work from a pollution perspective, and rephrase the issues in their own language, making them relevant to work at the local level. Sustainable consumption and production could be a more cross-cutting alternative, beyond just resource efficiency. It already is a UN Environment global programme. FBOs could contribute to the 10-year Framework of Programmes on SCP, and some already do.</p> <p>On the goal to Strengthen Partnerships with Faith-Based Organizations’ Leadership for Policy Impact, it was noted that the Pope’s encyclical <i>Laudato Si’</i> came from the top. A global movement needs direction from the top so that the faithful will follow it. It would be good to reach the highest levels of leadership. An alternative view was to go from the local to the global, starting with letting local communities determine their own priorities, and building from there. Most of the strategy is addressed towards reducing poverty and this is essential, but FBOs also have important messages for the rich who are over-consuming and producing most environmental impacts. There is a rising middle class even in developing countries being drawn into the consumer society that needs to be reached.</p> <p>The present draft for the goal to green Faith-Based organization’s assets and transform financing the SDGs appeared too focused on finance, and should include a wider greening of FBO’s consumption, assets, buildings and lands.</p> <p>For the goal on Science-Faith-Based Evidence, there was a feeling that the concept of science in this goal should be refined. Science should include traditional knowledge, which is often less organized. We need more that just knowledge and science. A holistic view is needed to transform people, and to help them reconnect with nature. An alternative would be to use the 2030 Agenda and its SDGs - and look for ways they embody faith beliefs. It is important to avoid the conflicts of science and religion, and to recognize their complementarity.</p> <p>FBOs were asked what they could offer to UN Environment, and to make concrete commitments, for example the use of their networks to share messages more widely, the availability of knowledge resources, and training of trainers to reach the grassroots of communities. One suggestion for the future would be for the UN to consider creating a Forum of Faith-Based Organizations comparable to the Forum of Indigenous Peoples, to formalize the dialogue between governments and FBOs in the UN framework.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 6 December 2017</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Wed, 06 Dec 2017 21:56:47 +0000 Arthur Dahl 900 at http://iefworld.org The Imperatives of Sustainable Development: Needs, Justice, Limits (book review) http://iefworld.org/node/899 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">The Imperatives of Sustainable Development: Needs, Justice, Limits (book review)</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Arthur Dahl</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">6. December 2017 - 23:48</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"> <div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);"> The Imperatives of Sustainable Development: Needs, Justice, Limits</h2> <p>by Erling Holden, Kristin Lingered, David Banister, Valeria Jana Schwanitz and August Wierling. <br> London and New York: Earthscan from Routledge. 263 p. published in July 2017.<br> book review by Arthur Lyon Dahl</p> </div> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;"> <p>The debate about sustainable development has been going on for thirty years since the World Commission on Environment and Development chaired by Gro Harlem Brundtland published “Our Common Future” in 1987. It has taken form in Agenda 21 (1992) and been redefined in the UN’s 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals, adopted in 2015. While the International Environment Forum has long emphasized the ethical foundations of sustainable development, these have often been lost in the complexity of the issues involved.</p> <p>Here is an extremely important book that aims to restore the ethical heart of sustainable development and to make it operational with indicators and thresholds defining the sustainable development space that should be the goal of all countries. From a holistic perspective, it lays out a simplified and transparent reality to capture the essentials of sustainability in a form understandable by the general public. The first chapter defines the moral imperatives of sustainable development, followed by three theoretical chapters on needs, justice and limits. The central chapter gives a normative model of sustainable development, followed by more practical chapters on implementation, with facts and figures, an analytic narrative, how much as been lost in translation, especially in implementing sustainable development at the local level, and a final chapter on next steps.</p> <p>The book starts from three equally important moral imperatives: satisfying human needs, ensuring social justice, and respecting environmental limits. For each of these, it reviews available theoretical frameworks, and selects the one most fit for purpose: Sen’s capability approach for needs; Rawl’s two principles of justice for justice; and the planetary boundary approach for limits. From these, it derives six sustainability themes, two for each moral imperative. For each theme, it reviews the available indicators and data availability, and recommends those that would be the most workable at the present time. It then sets thresholds for each indicator that would define what is sustainable or unsustainable for each indicator. The themes are non-negotiable and cannot be substituted. All must be achieved together for sustainability.</p> <p>The six sustainability themes and their headline indicators are:<br> 1. eradicating extreme poverty (Poverty line)<br> 2. enhancing individual human capabilities (Human Development Index)<br> 3. ensuring rich participation in society (Participatory Democracy Index)<br> 4. ensuring fair distribution of resources (Gini Coefficient)<br> 5. mitigating climate change (Tons CO2 equivalent per capita)<br> 6. safeguarding biosphere integrity (Aichi biodiversity targets)</p> <p>The result is the definition of a sustainable development space which should be the goal of all countries and the planetary system. There is no single pathway to this space. Different countries face different challenges and must follow different pathways. Calculations show that no country today is in that space, and for many the trajectory for at least some themes is in the wrong direction, especially with the human population still increasing within a limited global environment, per capita consumption increasing, and people living longer so that lifetime impacts are increasing as well. We have a long way to go, while the negative consequences of our unsustainability are accelerating.</p> <p>The book concludes with four issues that will define sustainable development over the next 30 years: developing countries and urbanization, resource efficiency and technology, healthy people and healthy planet, and governance - engagement and participation.</p> <p>The approach is academic, with frequent references to the literature and step-by-step development of their argument, which can take some time to get through but produces a certain clarity of thought that is important for such a complex subject. My only question concerns their optimism that urbanization is part of the solution to sustainability, when communities at a more human scale closer to their resources while integrated through information technology may be socially and environmentally more desirable. There has unfortunately been some sloppy editing, including some repetition and two places where lines of text have been repeated or misplaced, but these are minor concerns relative to the importance of the message.</p> <p>Holden and his co-authors, motivated by a fundamental desire for justice, have provided an essential complement to the Sustainable Development Goals, to which they have been careful to link their approach. Integrating all those goals, targets and indicators is a major challenge. Here is an essential set of tools to provide general measures of our progress (or lack of progress) towards sustainability. For organizations like IEF, and all faith-based organizations as well as many civil society organizations for which ethics are important, this book provides an approach to sustainable development with values at the centre. We should be pushing for its integration into international, national and local efforts to guide the transition to sustainability that is so urgently needed.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;"> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" height="66"></p> <p><small>Last updated 6 December 2017</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-blog-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Blog tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/257" hreflang="en">Sustainability, Systems</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 06 Dec 2017 21:48:30 +0000 Arthur Dahl 899 at http://iefworld.org Leaves - November IEF newsletter is available http://iefworld.org/node/255 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Leaves - November IEF newsletter is available</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">15. November 2017 - 14:35</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Read on line: <a href="/newslt101"><strong><em>Leaves</em></strong> 19(11) November 2017</a> light text version with fewer illustrations.<br /> Download as a <a href="/fl/IEF_Leaves171115.pdf">pdf version</a> [0.6 mb].</p> <table background="/gr/BLEAF1.JPG" style="background-color: rgb(0, 153, 0); width: 100%; height: 55px; text-align: left; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Wed, 15 Nov 2017 12:35:51 +0000 admin 255 at http://iefworld.org http://iefworld.org/node/255#comments Spiritual Leaders Deliver Interfaith Climate Declaration at COP23 http://iefworld.org/node/897 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Spiritual Leaders Deliver Interfaith Climate Declaration at COP23</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">15. November 2017 - 13:57</span> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">religions</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/9" hreflang="en">Climate change</a></div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Spiritual Leaders Deliver Interfaith Climate Declaration at COP23<br /> By Bicycle</h2> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Personal Commitment and Invitation to UN Climate Conference:<br /> “Walk Gently on Earth”</h3> </div> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <p><b>Bonn, 10 November 2017</b>. Scores of religious leaders and people of diverse faiths and spiritualities on bicycles, some wearing traditional religious clothing, delivered a multi-faith statement to the UN Conference on Climate Change (COP23), pledging to adopt sustainable behaviours themselves and calling on their followers and world leaders to do the same. The delivery also marked the launch of a new international, multi-faith sustainable lifestyles initiative.</p> <p>Bishop Marc Andrus of the Episcopal Diocese of California was among faith leaders carrying the message to the UN meeting on bikes, symbolizing a commitment to sustainable transport. “By changing our own lifestyles, the lifestyles of our congregants, and the consumption habits of our congregations, we can help make good on our commitment to the Paris Agreement,” he says. “For us, it’s a way to state loudly and clearly: We’re still in.”</p> <p>The COP23 Interfaith Climate Statement on Sustainable Lifestyle, entitled Walk Gently on Earth, represents a shared assertion by religious leaders globally that widespread sustainable behaviour change is required if global temperature rise is to meet the targets established by the Paris Climate Agreement.</p> <p>“Together we are coming to you with an invitation to embark on a journey towards compassionate simplicity for the sake of the climate, the human family and the community of life,” the statement says. The signatories pledged to reduce home energy use, adopt plant-based diets, and use cleaner modes of transportation, behaviours which scientists say make the greatest contribution to household greenhouse gas emissions in many countries.</p> <p>The statement marks the launch of a global Multi-Faith Sustainable Living Initiative, a campaign launched at a day-long symposium in Bonn November 9th. The livestreamed conference addressed the challenges and opportunities on how to best foster sustainable lifestyles. Partners in the Initiative include leading Protestant, Catholic, Evangelical, Jewish, Hindu, Muslim, Buddhist, Interfaith and Unitarian organizations.</p> <p>Following events in Bonn, a community of multi-faith partners will work with spiritual leaders and people of faith worldwide to secure formal commitments to a sustainable lifestyle. “These commitments will accelerate a growing multi-faith sustainable living movement,” says Imam Saffet Catovic, Senior Advisor for GreenFaith, the organization coordinating the initiative. “The commitments will be announced at a global weekend of commitment in 2018 through thousands of grassroots events at spiritual and religious centers around the world,” he says.</p> <p>Groups partnering on the Multi-Faith Sustainable Living Initiative include the Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual University, The Bhumi Project, CIDSE, Franciscan Action Network, the Global Catholic Climate Movement, the Global Muslim Climate Network, GreenFaith, Hazon, Islamic Society of North America, One Earth Sangha, Parliament of the World’s Religions, Friends World Committee for Consultation (Quaker), Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, the World Evangelical Alliance, and the World Council of Churches.</p> <hr /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <h4 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">COP32 Inter-Faith Climate Statement</h4> <h2 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">“Walk on Earth Gently”</h2> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">A Multi-Faith invitation to Sustainable Lifestyles<br /> <small>November 2017</small></h3> </div> <p>To all members of the human family and to leaders gathered at COP23:</p> <p>We extend our warm greetings. We represent the world’s family of spiritualities, faiths and religions who share a profound gratitude for our precious planet.</p> <p>Earth is a blessing. She supports life and is the basis of all our economies. She conveys beauty and evokes our recognition of something greater than ourselves. She is our temple, our mosque, our sanctuary, our cathedral. Our home.</p> <p>Our actions now threaten the delicate balance of life on Earth, with climate change posing a most grave danger. Record numbers of severe storms, droughts, fires, and related catastrophes leave trauma and grief in their wake. Recent months have witnessed the tragedy of such occurrences in the Caribbean, the US, and India. We shudder over the enormity of this suffering and over what more lies ahead.</p> <p>For thousands of years, our traditions have taught us to care for Earth. This responsibility has become urgent in recent decades. Our misuse of Earth’s generosity, while improving conditions for many, is not improving them for all and is fraying the web of life. The most vulnerable among us, those least responsible for this global threat, suffer the impacts of a warming climate unfairly and unjustly.</p> <p>We have begun to respond, raising consciousness and starting to consume more sustainably. We have implored leaders to act. We have studied, prayed and petitioned, advocated, marched and mobilized. We have awakened to the urgent challenge and begun to change our ways.</p> <p>However, we are at a crossroads. The Paris Agreement affirmed limiting temperature rise to well below 2°C, while pursuing efforts to a far safer 1.5°C limit. Our friends from Fiji and small island states, understanding the stakes and underscoring the science, have told us “1.5 to stay alive.” Yet we are currently headed for warming of 3°C or more, perilously beyond this limit.</p> <p>This challenge is both dire and urgent. It calls for us to act.</p> <p>As religious and spiritual leaders, we are committing to make changes in our own lives, and to support the members of our communities in doing the same. Together, we come to you with an invitation to embark on a journey towards compassionate simplicity for the sake of the climate, the human family, and the community of life.</p> <p>For many of us, changes in three areas make the greatest impact: dramatically reducing emissions from our home energy use, adopting a plant-based diet and reducing food waste, and minimizing automobile and air travel. Because of the gravity of our situation, substantial and long-term changes in these areas are indispensable if we are to reach a 1.5°C future, particularly for those of us in communities whose carbon footprints exceed sustainable levels. We pledge our commitment to such change.</p> <p>Through this collective effort, we look forward to creating a global community of conscience and practice in which we learn to put belief into action in relation to our own lifestyles. Our spiritual and faith communities will give us hope and companions for this journey. We will share ideas, materials, and stories of struggle and success. Our practices of mindfulness, spiritual discipline and prayer will enable us to grow. These ancient teachings and practices, and our renewed commitments and willingness to strive, will help us build pathways towards a sustainable future.</p> <p>We wish to be clear that we understand that systemic change is required to solve this crisis. We will continue to advocate for the policies that are so urgently needed. However, we also believe that individual commitments and behaviors are as important in addressing climate change as they are in addressing poverty, racism, and other grave social ills. And we know that our spiritualities and traditions offer wisdom about finding happiness in a purposeful life, family and friendships, not in an overabundance of things. The world needs such wisdom; it is our privilege both to share and to seek to embody it.</p> <p>We invite you to join the many others willing to walk this path by adding your name to this document, and by preparing to make commitments in the three areas named above. The diverse groups coming together in this moment will reach out to invite you to become involved in a programme of support and action which will take shape over the coming year. Let us pray and hope we can come together in love for each other, those who suffer from climate change, future generations, and planet Earth.</p> <p>Let us commit to walk gently on Earth.</p> <hr /> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Quotes from religious and spiritual leaders on COP23 Interfaith Climate Statement</h3> <p>Addressing climate change by reducing our carbon footprint is a moral responsibility as Khualfa al-ard – caretakers, stewards, and guardians of the earth. We must care for all of creation. Reshaping our patterns of consumption and conservation not only help preserve the planet for us and our future generations, but also improve overall public health and economic prosperity, particularly for the vulnerable amongst us who are most severely impacted by climate change. <b>Dr. Azhar Azeez, President, Islamic Society of North America</b></p> <p>As Muslims we are enjoined to be the custodians of God on this earth. We must walk softly thereupon and do no harm. This ethic is desperately needed if we are to help avert a looming climate disaster. -- <b>Imam Zaid Shakir, Co-founder, Zaytuna College, Berkeley, CA</b></p> <p>God the creator has given us this world as our common home, together with all that are created and living here. We have to walk on the land and sail at the sea with care and deep respect for what is given. To love God and to love our neighbor means that we also love the creation of God. -- <b>Rev Dr. Olav Fykse-Tveit, General Secretary of World Council of Churches</b></p> <p>Keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius will take people of all faiths and all nations working together as quickly as possible. In Laudato Si' Pope Francis said, "All of us can cooperate as instruments of God for the care of creation. " That is why Catholics, through the Global Catholic Climate Movement, have signed this interfaith statement committing to adopting a sustainable lifestyle. We stand with our brothers and sisters of all faiths to protect creation the poor and vulnerable. -- Bishop Allwyn D'Silva Auxiliary Bishop of Archdiocese of Bombay</p> <p>Climate change isn't a side issue for Catholics. It’s one of the most important things we can do to live out our faith. It's a way to protect the poor and care for the gifts God has given us. With sisters and brothers from all faith backgrounds standing beside us, we have good cause for hope. Climate solutions are within our grasp. -- <b>Tomas Insua, Executive Director, Global Catholic Climate Movement</b></p> <p>Evangelicals responding to the biblical call to care for creation want to know how they can live joyful, faith-consistent lives that care for God’s gift of creation. In addition to advocating for necessary large scale solutions to tackle climate change— which is the greatest creation care challenge of our generation, our individual lifestyle choices, when scaled up can make a big difference. -- <b>Dr. Chris Elisara, Director World Evangelical Creation Care Task Force.</b></p> <p>In the Hindu tradition we believe the world is one family. That world includes not only human beings but also all living beings, all of Mother Nature and Mother Earth. Therefore, it is incumbent upon each of us to live in a way that is sustainable for all beings with whom we share this planet, today and for all future generations. To abuse it, neglect it, or destroy it, is sacrilege. -- <b>Sadhvi Bhagawati Saraswati, President Parmarth Niketan, Rishikesh, Global Interfaith WASH Alliance</b></p> <p>We cannot be bystanders when our planet is in such danger; we belong to this living web and are called to consciously engage. While that engagement needs to address the larger political and economic systems that can wreak such havoc, it also needs to include our daily relationships with each other and the earth. Can our daily choices in consuming and sharing our own resources reflect the truth that we are a part of this precious world and it needs our care? -- <b>Tara Brach, Buddhist author, teacher and founder of the Insight Meditation Community of Washington, DC</b></p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 15 November 2017</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Wed, 15 Nov 2017 11:57:52 +0000 admin 897 at http://iefworld.org European Center for Peace and Development http://iefworld.org/node/896 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">European Center for Peace and Development</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">4. November 2017 - 23:48</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">European Center for Peace and Development</h2> <p>International Round Table, 27 October 2017<br /> Global ECPD Youth Forum, 28 October 2017<br /> Belgrade City Hall, Serbia</p> </div> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /><!--break--> <p>The European Center for Peace and Development, affiliated with the University for Peace established by the United Nations, has been working for over thirty years on reconciliation, religious tolerance and human security in Eastern Europe and most particularly the Western Balkans. Based in Belgrade, Serbia, with branches throughout the Western Balkans, it convenes meetings, encourages research, and offers advanced degrees on issues related to peace in the region. The International Environment Forum, through its president Arthur Dahl, has been supporting these efforts for the last decade.</p> <p>On 27 October 2017, ECPD held an International Round Table in Belgrade City Hall on ”Peace and Democratic Multilateralism”, chaired by H.E. Prof. Dr. Federico Mayor, former Director-General of UNESCO, President of the Foundation for a Culture of Peace, and President of the ECPD Council. Other opening speakers were Dr. Ouided Bouchamaoui, Nobel Peace Prize 2015, and H.E. Prof. Dr. Erhard Busek, former Vice-Chancellor of Austria. Panels of distinguished speakers addressed “Global Institutions to Face Global Threats”, “Peace and Development: Integral, Endogenous, Sustainable and Human Development for a Dignified Life for All”, “UN Priorities in the New Era: Food, Water, Health, Environment and Education”, “The Agenda for Peace: The Declaration and the Programme of Action for a Culture of Peace”, concluding with “Concrete Proposals for Peace and Non-Violence at the Worldwide Level”. Arthur Dahl was a rapporteur for the round table, chaired one session, and presented a paper on “UN Charter Revision as the Foundation for Peace” based on joint work with Augusto Lopez-Claros and Maja Groff.</p> <p><img alt="ECPD Round Table" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/ECPD171027_1.jpg" /> .&nbsp;<img alt="keynote speakers" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/ECPD171027_5.jpg" /></p> <p>The wide-ranging presentations raised many important issues for peace. There were diagnoses of the problems, such as fragmentation, identity politics, xenophobia and populism, growing inequality, the failure treat migration properly in Europe, and the possibility that the third world war has already started. There were also proposals for solutions and ways forward.</p> <p>The crises in the world show the importance of solidarity and dialogue as both an ideal and a requirement to address emergencies and to respond to globalisation with a new equilibrium. It is easier to declare war than to end a state of war, since there is little incentive to end warfare if you are not directly suffering from it, leading to a negative spiral with no answer.</p> <p>It is essential to modify the United Nations to become a federal democracy, more participative, with new structures to replace national sovereignty and egoism. Alternatives like the G7-G20 are divisive and have not been effective. we must either act now, or wait to be forced to act. Radical changes are needed to make the UN an effective structure for action with a new paradigm for governance. The UN needs to adapt itself to fight terrorism, and to attack the roots of the problems that lead to terrorism, bridging the gap between the West and the Islamic world. The UN General Assembly should become a more representative legislative body, and means of enforcement should be strengthened and made mandatory, including an International Court of Justice with binding jurisdiction over all states. One proposal was for two new security councils for the environment and for social-economic issues. The Sustainable Development Goals are a point of departure and an opportunity to strengthen the framework for multilateral development.</p> <p>With the progress in science and technology, a new civilization is not a utopia but a goal to be approached gradually. Research and education need to be emphasized. The focus should be on human beings and our global human purpose. A sense of global citizenship is stronger today in developing countries and among young people, and regressing in more industrialised countries. Our common sense of humanity needs to be strengthened to overcome an increasingly individualistic world. What we are lacking is visionary leadership.</p> <p>The proceedings will be published by ECPD.</p> <hr /> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Global ECPD Youth Forum</h3> <p>The next day, ECPD organized a Global Youth Forum with over 50 participants from many countries, on ”Youth Peace-builders for a Sustainable Future”, for which Arthur was a co-chair and moderator. Federico Mayor, Ouided Bouchamaoui and Erhard Busek again gave opening keynotes on the importance of youth for peace. The text of the Nobel Peace Laureate’s speech is given below.</p> <p><img alt="Ouided Bouchamaoui and Federico Mayor" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/ECPD171028_6.jpg" /> . <img alt="Erhard Busek" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/ECPD171028_17.jpg" /></p> <p>In the morning, presentations were given on “Peace and Education as Inseparable Aspects of Civilization”, and on “Unity in Diversity: Inclusion for a Sustainable Future”. One group called Youth United for Peace described their local efforts to heal the wounds caused by the fighting in the different cities of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Other youth were supporting the rapprochement process in divided Cyprus. Another group of youth organized a dialogue caravan through Serbia. There was a strong emphasis on vulnerable groups, exclusion, and the involvement of women. Dr. Farhang Tahzib described capacity building through the Youth Spiritual Empowerment Programme, with several participants present among the youth.</p> <p><img alt="Farhang Tahzib and participants" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/ECPD171028_37.jpg" /> . <img alt="Jaleh reporting on the group exercise" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/ECPD171028_65.jpg" /></p> <p>The afternoon was occupied with workshops on “Conflict Prevention and Interfaith Dialogue”, “Building Peace Online: How the Internet and Social Media can be Utilised for Advocacy and Peace”, and “Essential Skills for Today’s Sustainable Development Challenges”. There was an interesting report on research in Catalonia on youth use of the Internet for religion, with 65% of the youth considering themselves believers, and the creation of online communities but not yet much interreligious dialogue. Youth were drawing on the messages of Jesus, Luther, Abraham, Baha’u’llah and Muhammad in the search for trust, knowledge, a desire to help, good timing, and the power of persuasion.</p> <p><img alt="working groups" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/ECPD171028_45.jpg" /> . <img alt="working groups" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/ECPD171028_47.jpg" /></p> <p>The participants in the Youth Forum went away stimulated, encouraged and motivated to work even harder for peace and sustainability.</p> <hr /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Opening Speech<br /> by Dr. Ouided Bouchamaoui</h3> <p>Nobel Peace Prize 2015, and President, Tunisian Confederation of Industry, Trade and Handicrafts (UTICA)<br /> 5th Global ECPD Youth Forum, Belgrade City Hall, 28 October 2017</p> <p><img alt="Ouided Bouchamaoui" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/ECPD171028_15.jpg" /></p> </div> <p>Never before in the history of mankind have the subjects of education and peace been so acutely and seriously felt. We are constantly reminded of their importance by the daily tragedies occurring in the four corners of the planet.</p> <p>Tragedies caused by under-development, poverty, exclusion, unemployment, ignorance, social tensions, conflicts, wars and terrorism are all daily reminders of the prominence of the issues related to education and peace and of the extent to which they are intertwined.</p> <p>In our daily struggle against all of those problems we can only brandish peace as a weapon. We do it by promoting education, sport, culture, and all values underlying “living together” such as tolerance, accepting others no matter how different they are in nationality, race, faith, or skin color.</p> <p>We have to stand united against atrocity, ignorance, decadence, fear, intimidation, and all those who want to spread terror.</p> <p>It is through propagating knowledge and upholding the universal values of coming together, tolerance and freedom, through investing in art and culture, and through providing equal chances and fair access to wealth that freedom-loving countries can forever consecrate peace as a daily practice and stand steadfast in the face of all types of extremists.</p> <p>By being anchored in the values of tolerance and openness, The European Center for Peace and Development creates opportunities for people to come together internationally and engage in actions which consecrate these values.</p> <p>Today, Mankind is facing a serious challenge: create a world with stronger bonds of solidarity. It must be a world full of justice and equality, where sharing and mutual respect are daily practices, and where the wellbeing of each individual comes from his or her contribution to the general prosperity.</p> <p>Because of the violent transformations happening in our world, and because ignorance, intolerance, exclusion, and underdevelopment are feeding conflicts and violence, we have to more than ever respond with education for peace, human rights, democracy, tolerance and mutual understanding between cultures; in other words, we have to educate future citizens of this world about the principles of “living together”, about respecting each other and transcending all of our differences, be they in culture, religion, origin, or other. We need to create bonds of friendship beyond our frontiers; we need to be curious about other ways of life. History teaches us that whenever cultures came into contact with each other for peaceful exchanges of ideas and knowledge, the entire humanity progressed. It is then our duty to keep that flame burning.</p> <p>Educating youth on how to become citizens must also be done in a global perspective. In other words, we need to find ways to prepare youth and allow them to take part in the decision process of issues crucial to the future of all peoples. In an increasingly interconnected world where the actions of each one of us can have far away consequences, there is no longer room for policies of isolationism, exclusion, and closure. Our destiny is to live together; so why not have future generations develop right now their understanding of the concept of “living together” and the competencies needed for that?</p> <p>Our modest experience in the National Dialogue in Tunisia has taught us that whenever there is a will to do it, living together is possible. Thanks to dialogue, to listening to what the other has to say, and to a common desire to accept our differences, we were able with our social partners to extricate our country from its political crisis. It is obvious that experiencing intercultural learning as applied here can only strengthen the values of dialogue and openness.</p> <p>I thank you once again for this opportunity to participate in this important Forum, which, given the quality of the participants, will be a new milestone in the promotion of Peace education for our Youth.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 1 November 2017</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Sat, 04 Nov 2017 21:48:26 +0000 admin 896 at http://iefworld.org http://iefworld.org/node/896#comments In Search of a Better World (book review) http://iefworld.org/node/895 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">In Search of a Better World (book review)</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Arthur Dahl</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">4. November 2017 - 21:03</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">In Search of a Better World (book review)</h2> <p>by Arthur Lyon Dahl</p> </div> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <p>One of the most unsustainable aspects of the modern world is the continuing presence of massive violations of human rights, which our technological sophistication only make more visible, numbing our human sensibility. In "<i>In Search of a Better World: A Human RIghts Odyssey</i>" (Canada: House of Anansi Press, 2017), based on the 2017 Massey Lectures, <b>Payam Akhavan</b> has written a most remarkable and moving autobiography, which immediately reached number one for non-fiction on the Canadian best-seller list upon its publication in September. You cannot help but be profoundly touched on reading it.</p> <p>The author, himself a religious refugee as a child from the persecution of the Baha'is in Iran, went on to become a distinguished human rights lawyer, UN investigator of genocide in Bosnia, Cambodia, Guatemala, Rwanda and Timor-Leste, UN Prosecutor at The Hague, a member of the International Court of Arbitration, and now Professor of International Law at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. He has met both the victims and perpetrators of genocide, and delves deeply into the causes and effects of mass hatred and violence from the perspective of one who has been there and seen it. This is a deeply human book, sharing moments of compassion and revulsion, of tenderness and understanding, while acknowledging that the depths of human suffering can never be fully shared, and admiring the strength of the human spirit to rise above even the most unimaginable horrors.</p> <p>He begins with the knowledge of suffering, both his own and that of his family and fellow Baha'is in Iran. This started him on a pursuit of global justice, leading to a doctorate from Harvard Law School. He traces the evolution of international law holding leaders individually accountable for their acts, from the Nuremberg trials after World War II, to the creation of the ad hoc International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia where he was one of the first UN prosecutors, and a similar tribunal for Rwanda, leading to the establishment of the International Criminal Court. His work took him into the field, to Sarajevo in the midst of its murderous siege and to the opposing Bosnian Serb Republic, to the Rwanda of a massacred million, to visit mass graves and interview victims, leading finally to justice as a redemption for our shared humanity.</p> <p>A major theme is the selectiveness of our will to intervene, taking action when it is in some geopolitical or economic interest, or leaving millions to a violent fate when no one outside seems to care, until it is too late. I was myself on a UN committee with the role to anticipate humanitarian crises and to pre-position aid for a humanitarian response. We failed to anticipate the scale of the Rwandan genocide and the role of extremist radio to incite mass murder. Akhavan dissects how that whole process unfolded, with the UN simply withdrawing since the big powers did not want to get involved. His analysis is important, as it shows the importance of early intervention to prevent the spread of hatred and violence before genocide can get under way.</p> <p>He is understandably critical of academia and the ivory tower that dissects human suffering and calamity from a distance, and well as the halls of diplomacy at the United Nations, with high words and hand-wringing followed by cowardice and inaction. He shows again and again how cynical politicians in pursuit of national interests are always ready to sacrifice the poor for power and profit. The book exposes the revolting underbelly of Western "civilization" and the superficiality of materialistic consumer society where unimaginable horrors elsewhere appear briefly in the media and then vanish, until finally they spill over into terrorism at home.</p> <p>In one chapter, he shows how geopolitical rivalry leading to the war in Afghanistan planted the seeds of terrorist movements that eventually reached out to Western capitals and the destruction of the twin towers in New York, where his family narrowly escaped death. More recently, Syria has been a tragic victim of the same self-interest and paralysis. He explores rape as an instrument of war, the exploitation of child soldiers, and other modern human rights abuses, where evil has been cultivated for selfish benefit. This contrasts with the emerging spirit of human rights and the positive signs of a growing awareness of the oneness of humankind and our higher human purpose.</p> <p>Despite the repeated stories of abuse, violence and horror, this is ultimately a hopeful book, showing the power of the human spirit to overcome the unimaginable, how suffering can lead to a blossoming of higher human qualities. Akhavan's story itself is one of a dogged search for truth and justice, and the small steps that can gradually lead to the necessary changes in society to respond to the depths of depravity in which we still too often find ourselves. Those of us who have not seen such evil at close range can take this book as a lesson that we too must act to make the world a better place.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 4 November 2017</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-blog-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Sat, 04 Nov 2017 19:03:33 +0000 Arthur Dahl 895 at http://iefworld.org Bicentenary of Baha'u'llah http://iefworld.org/Bahaullah <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Bicentenary of Baha&#039;u&#039;llah</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">30. September 2017 - 18:46</span> <section class="field field--name-comment field--type-comment field--label-hidden comment-wrapper"> </section> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/95" hreflang="en">Baha&#039;i Faith</a></div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">The Bicentenary of Bahá'u'lláh</h2> <p>1817-2017</p> </div> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <p>The International Environment Forum (IEF) has always described itself as a Bahá'í-inspired professional organization for the environment and sustainability, and its membership is largely composed of scientists, academics, experts and educators working in relevant fields. What then does it mean to be Bahá'í-inspired? The IEF draws on the ethical and spiritual principles of the world’s religions, in particular the Bahá’í Faith, as a complement to scientific knowledge in addressing the challenges of environmental management and sustainable development. A scientific understanding, by itself, is usually not sufficient to change human behaviour. Motivating change, either in individual lifestyles and consumption patterns, or collectively in communities, enterprises and government, requires a commitment to moral principles or values and some vision of social improvement that science, by itself, does not provide. It is this interface between ethics and science that the IEF addresses.</p> <p>The principles of the oneness of humankind; unity in diversity; moderation; the fundamental reality of increasing levels of cooperation, complexity, and reciprocity throughout the planet; and the vital importance of ecological balance; that are at the heart of IEF, come from the teachings of <b>Bahá'u'lláh</b> (1817-1892) the bicentenary of whose birth is being celebrated this year on 22 October 2017. Bahá'u'lláh (a title meaning the Glory of God) was born in Teheran, Persia, in 1817, and died a prisoner in Akka, Palestine, in 1892. He not only renewed the moral principles that are the foundation of all religions, but provided the social teachings necessary for building a world civilization whose coming He anticipated, hence His relevance to the environment and sustainability.</p> <p>Bahá'u'lláh loved nature. He said that “<span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 153);">The country is the world of the soul, the city is the world of bodies.</span>”</p> <p>He taught the harmony of science and religion as complementary domains of knowledge and experience. “<span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 153);">Great indeed is the claim of scientists and craftsmen on the peoples of the world.... In truth, knowledge is a veritable treasure for man.</span>” Long before the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals, He called for an integrated approach drawing on both science and religion, which need to be in balance for society to advance: “<span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 153);">Regard ye the world as a man's body, which is afflicted with divers ailments, and the recovery of which dependeth upon the harmonizing of all its component elements.</span>”</p> <p>He warned of the dangers of the excesses of material civilization: “<span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 153);">If carried to excess, civilization will prove as prolific a source of evil as it had been of goodness when kept within the restraints of moderation.</span>”</p> <p>He called for simplicity in lifestyle: “<span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 153);">Take from this world only to the measure of your needs, and forego that which exceedeth them. Observe equity in all your judgements, and transgress not the bounds of justice, nor be of them that stray from its path.</span>”</p> <p>He emphasized justice as the central principle of social organization: “<span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 153);">The best beloved of all things in My sight is Justice.... By its aid thou shalt see with thy own eyes and not through the eyes of others, and shalt know of thine own knowledge and not through the knowledge of thy neighbour.</span>”</p> <p>While he did not propose a specific economic system, He said that everyone should have an occupation, so society must give everyone the opportunity to work for both its material and spiritual benefits. “<span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 153);">It is incumbent upon each one of you to engage in some occupation - such as a craft, a trade or the like.... Waste not your hours in idleness and sloth, but occupy yourselves with what will profit you and others.</span>” Extremes of wealth and poverty should be eliminated. “<span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 153);">Man's merit lieth in service and virtue and not in the pageantry of wealth and riches.</span>” Following these teachings, it is clear that now is the time to abandon outworn ideologies and economic systems that no longer meet the needs of society, and to experiment with new approaches, starting at the community level.</p> <p>Bahá'u'lláh can be seen as a precursor of the environmental movement and an early exponent of sustainability. The lessons being learned in Baha’i communities as they try to put His teachings into practice can also serve as examples for possible ways forward towards sustainability. For more information on Bahá'u'lláh and the Baha’i Faith, resources and links are provided <a href="/bahai.htm">here</a> and at <a href="http://www.bahai.org">http://www.bahai.org</a>. For more about the bicentenary celebration, go to <a href="http://bicentenary.bahai.org">http://bicentenary.bahai.org</a>.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 30 September 2017</small></p> </div> </div> Sat, 30 Sep 2017 15:46:57 +0000 admin 892 at http://iefworld.org http://iefworld.org/Bahaullah#comments How Should Bahá’ís Talk about Climate Change? http://iefworld.org/node/889 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">How Should Bahá’ís Talk about Climate Change?</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">3. August 2017 - 23:30</span> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/9" hreflang="en">Climate change</a></div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>For Baha'is among our members who are interested in discussing climate change without becoming involved in partisan political disputes, IEF member Christine Muller has just published an article for the Wilmette Institute newsletter on "How Should Bahá’ís Talk about Climate Change? Applying Recent Institutional Guidance". The link to the article is <a href="http://wilmetteinstitute.org/how-should-bahais-talk-about-climate-change/">http://wilmetteinstitute.org/how-should-bahais-talk-about-climate-change/</a>. While it refers specifically to the United States where climate change is particularly the subject of partisan conflicts, the principles are relevant in many other situations.</p> <p> </p></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Thu, 03 Aug 2017 20:30:38 +0000 admin 889 at http://iefworld.org http://iefworld.org/node/889#comments Challenges of Rural Sustainability in France http://iefworld.org/node/885 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Challenges of Rural Sustainability in France</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Arthur Dahl</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">14. July 2017 - 16:17</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center; background-color: rgb(0, 153, 0); height: 35px;"> <h3 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(255, 255,255);">Arthur Dahl's Blog at International Environment Forum</h3> </div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Challenges of Rural Sustainability in France</h2> <p>Arthur Lyon Dahl<br /> <small><a href="http://yabaha.net/dahl/">http://yabaha.net/dahl/</a></small></p> </div> <hr /> <p>On 7-9 July 2017, I participated in a meeting of the Triglav Circle (<a href="http://www.triglavcircleonline.org/">http://www.triglavcircleonline.org/</a>), which met in the Nievre Department in the Burgundy (Bourgogne) Region of central France. The Triglav Circle was founded after the 1995 UN Social Summit in Copenhagen by its Secretary-General, Jacques Baudot, and his wife Barbara, to continue the discussion of social issues and sustainability, particularly from an ethical and religious perspective. Over the years it has involved many leading thinkers and theologians, and contributes to UN processes. Participants in the circle this year included a former Secretary-General of the World Council of Churches from Germany and his wife, a retired American professor of economics, a state official dealing with information technologies, a French economist, and a Dutch development specialist, among others.</p> <p>The theme this year was <b>Rurality</b>, and the local participants included a farm couple and their son who will inherit the farm, a beekeeper, the local priest, a retired Prefect (French Government official) now involved in local associations, the mayor of a village of 27 residents, a local land owner with a chateau and land titles going back over 500 years, the local leader of a farmers union, and other representatives of rural France. The Nievre is one of the most rural departments in France, and suffers from depopulation and declining services as young people move away. You can see photos at <a href="http://www.yabaha.net/dahl/travel/t2017/Nievre/Triglav.html">http://www.yabaha.net/dahl/travel/t2017/Nievre/Triglav.html</a>.</p> <p>In its discussions of rurality, the Triglav Circle explored many challenges to French agriculture which present an excellent case study of the multiple dimensions of sustainability. The government has professionalized the field, so that only someone with degrees in agriculture can take over a farm. The long hours of work are not compensated financially, and regulations are increasingly complex, requiring lots of paperwork. The prices for farm products decline continuously from the pressure of cheap imports from countries with lower labour and environmental standards, and from supermarket chains that want to lower prices and increase profit margins, so only the middlemen really profit from agriculture today. Up to 40% of revenues come from European Union subsidies, but if a farm is too small it does not qualify. A single family can succeed with a farm of 240 hectares, but becoming much larger will lead to bankruptcy from extra charges. It costs at least 400,000 euros to buy and equip a farm, which is beyond the reach of young farmers, and it takes many years to pay off the loans and begin to make a modest income. When a farmer retires, it is often impossible to find someone to take over the farm, and it is usually bought up by a big agrobusiness trying to build a monopoly position.</p> <p>One case was cited of a farmer who earned a reasonable living without any subsidies, with small scale organic production respecting the soil and the animals, sold to a local circle of regular consumers without middlemen, preparing all his products himself. This would seem like an ideal for sustainability, but he could only do this by ignoring all government regulations. If he sent his animals to a slaughterhouse as the law required, he would have no control over the welfare of the animals or the preparation of the final products after they left his farm.</p> <p>For years, the French government has encouraged industrial-scale farming under the pressure of agricultural lobbies, and regulated against any alternatives, complemented by European Union legislation that, while in the common interest, often has negative side effects. Only government-approved commercial seeds can be sold. Farms with less than 10 cows cannot receive subsidies. There is a rigidity in the system that discourages innovation.</p> <p>The discussion explored alternative agricultural models and diversified sources of income, as well as the important social dimensions of rural communities that need to be maintained. There were not enough children to keep schools open, or patients to support health services. The Catholic priest, of Flemish origin, was now servicing 40 parishes, and his replacement on retirement was coming from India. Internet coverage would need to be subsidized, since the density was too low to support commercial services, yet without it, new residents could not be attracted to the region. Public transport was also a problem. Artisans and small businesses were closing as unprofitable, in a downward spiral of economic activity. Forestry was important in the region, but most logs were sent elsewhere for processing. There was potential to attract second homes and retirees, but only if essential services were available. It was clear that only an integrated approach treating many problems simultaneously could turn the situation around.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="IEFlogo" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 14 July 2017</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-blog-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Fri, 14 Jul 2017 13:17:00 +0000 Arthur Dahl 885 at http://iefworld.org IEF Toolkit for the Sustainable Development Goals http://iefworld.org/node/882 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">IEF Toolkit for the Sustainable Development Goals</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">12. June 2017 - 18:35</span> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/241" hreflang="en">Sustainable Development Goals</a></div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <p style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">IEF Toolkit for the Sustainable Development Goals</p> <p>Resources that can be useful in explaining and applying the Sustainable Development Goals at the community, organization and individual levels.</p> </div> <!--break--> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <p>The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), adopted at a United Nations General Assembly Summit in September 2015 (<a href="#UN2015">UN 2015</a>), are widely accepted as the latest definition of sustainable development and how to achieve it by 2030. The 17 Goals include 169 targets, and over 240 indicators have been identified to monitor progress towards those targets. Governments are now determining their share of the global goals, and setting their own national goals, targets and indicators. This is by definition a top-down process, and provides an essential global framework, but action by governments will not be sufficient in itself to achieve the SDGs. They are goals for everyone, and everyone needs to be involved, but they need to be simplified for use at other levels.</p> <p>To help this process, the International Environment Forum has contributed to various discourses on the SDGs and their relevance to businesses, communities and individuals, and how they reflect Baha'i principles in practice. This has included translating the global goals for governments into forms more relevant at the local and organizational levels. These versions are collected here as a toolkit from which you can take or adapt the SDGs for discussion and action within your organization, community or family.</p> <hr /> <p style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">&nbsp;</p> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><a href="#Communities">SDGs Targets for Communities</a><br /> <a href="#Individuals">SDGs for Individuals</a><br /> <a href="#Business">SDG targets for Businesses</a><br /> <a href="#Bahai">SDGs and Baha'i principles</a></p> </div> <hr /> <p id="Communities" style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">SDG TARGETS RELEVANT FOR LOCAL COMMUNITIES (107)</p> <p><i>These extracts from the SDG targets describe actions that any local community can undertake at its own level.</i></p> <p><b>Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere</b><br /> 1.1 ...eradicate extreme poverty for all people everywhere...<br /> 1.2 ...reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions...<br /> 1.3 Implement... social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and... achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable<br /> 1.4 ...ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including micro finance<br /> 1.5 ...build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters</p> <p><b>Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture</b><br /> 2.1 ...end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round<br /> 2.2 ...end all forms of malnutrition..., and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons<br /> 2.3 ...double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment<br /> 2.4 ...ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality</p> <p><b>Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages</b><br /> 3.1 ...reduce the... maternal mortality ratio<br /> 3.2 ...end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age<br /> 3.3 ...end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases and combat hepatitis, water-borne diseases and other communicable diseases<br /> 3.4 ...reduce.. premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being<br /> 3.5 Strengthen the prevention and treatment of substance abuse, including narcotic drug abuse and harmful use of alcohol<br /> 3.6 ...halve the number of... deaths and injuries from road traffic accidents<br /> 3.7 ...ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education<br /> 3.8 Achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all<br /> 3.9 ...substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination<br /> 3.b ...provide access to medicines for all</p> <p><b>Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all</b><br /> 4.1 ...ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and effective learning outcomes<br /> 4.2 ...ensure that all girls and boys have access to quality early childhood development, care and pre-primary education so that they are ready for primary education<br /> 4.3 ...ensure equal access for all women and men to affordable and quality technical, vocational and tertiary education, including university<br /> 4.4 ...substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship<br /> 4.5 ...eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples and children in vulnerable situations 4.6 ...ensure that all youth and a substantial proportion of adults, both men and women, achieve literacy and numeracy<br /> 4.7 ...ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture's contribution to sustainable development<br /> 4.a Build and upgrade education facilities that are child, disability and gender sensitive and provide safe, nonviolent, inclusive and effective learning environments for all</p> <p><b>Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls</b><br /> 5.1 End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere<br /> 5.2 Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including... sexual and other types of exploitation<br /> 5.3 Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation<br /> 5.4 Recognize and value unpaid care and domestic work through the provision of public services, infrastructure and social protection policies and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household and the family...<br /> 5.5 Ensure women's full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life<br /> 5.6 Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights<br /> 5.a Undertake reforms to give women equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to ownership and control over land and other forms of property, financial services, inheritance and natural resources<br /> 5.b Enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology, to promote the empowerment of women 5.c Adopt and strengthen sound policies and enforceable legislation for the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls at all levels</p> <p><b>Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all</b><br /> 6.1 ...achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all<br /> 6.2 ...achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations<br /> 6.3 ...improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse...<br /> 6.4 ...substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity<br /> 6.5 ...implement integrated water resources management at all levels<br /> 6.6 ...protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including mountains, forests, wetlands, rivers, aquifers and lakes<br /> 6.b Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management</p> <p><b>Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all</b><br /> 7.1 ...ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services<br /> 7.2 ...increase substantially the share of renewable energy...<br /> 7.3 ...double the... rate of improvement in energy efficiency<br /> 7.b ...expand infrastructure and upgrade technology for supplying modern and sustainable energy services for all...</p> <p><b>Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all</b><br /> 8.2 Achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation, including through a focus on high-value added and labour-intensive sectors<br /> 8.3 ...support productive activities, decent job creation, entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation, and encourage the formalization and growth of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises, including through access to financial services<br /> 8.5 ...achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value<br /> 8.6 ...substantially reduce the proportion of youth not in employment, education or training<br /> 8.8 Protect labour rights and promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment<br /> 8.9 ...promote sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products</p> <p><b>Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation</b><br /> 9.1 Develop quality, reliable. sustainable and resilient infrastructure... to support economic development and human well-being. with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all<br /> 9.2 Promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization<br /> 9.3 Increase the access of small-scale industrial and other enterprises.... to financial services, including affordable credit, and their integration into value chains and markets<br /> 9.4 ...upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes...<br /> 9.c Significantly increase access to information and communications technology and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet...</p> <p><b>Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries</b><br /> <br /> 10.1 ...progressively achieve and sustain income growth of the bottom 40 per cent of the population at a rate higher than the national average<br /> 10.2 ...empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status<br /> 10.3 Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies and action in this regard<br /> 10.4 Adopt policies, especially fiscal, wage and social protection policies, and progressively achieve greater equality<br /> 10.7 Facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies</p> <p><b>Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable</b><br /> 11.1 ...ensure access for all to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic services and upgrade slums<br /> 11.2 ...provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons<br /> 11.3 ...enhance inclusive and sustainable urbanization and capacity for participatory, integrated and sustainable human settlement planning and management...<br /> 11.4 Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the... cultural and natural heritage<br /> 11.5 ...significantly reduce the number of deaths and the number of people affected... by disasters, including water-related disasters, with a focus on protecting the poor and people in vulnerable situations<br /> 11.6 ...reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management<br /> 11.7 ...provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities<br /> 11.a Support positive economic, social and environmental links between urban, peri-urban and rural areas...<br /> 11.b ...adopt and implement integrated policies and plans towards inclusion, resource efficiency, mitigation and adaptation to climate change, resilience to disasters...<br /> 11.c Support... building sustainable and resilient buildings utilizing local materials</p> <p><b>Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns</b><br /> 12.2 ...achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources<br /> 12.3 ...halve per capita... food waste at the retail and consumer levels<br /> 12.4 ...achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle... and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment<br /> 12.5 ...substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse<br /> 12.6 Encourage companies... to adopt sustainable practices and to integrate sustainability information into their reporting cycle<br /> 12.7 Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable<br /> 12.8 ...ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature<br /> 12.b Develop and implement tools to monitor sustainable development impacts for sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products</p> <p><b>Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts</b><br /> 13.1 Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters...<br /> 13.3 Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning<br /> [support implementation of the Paris Agreement]</p> <p><b>Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development</b><br /> 14.1 ...prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution<br /> 14.2 ...sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration...<br /> 14.5 ...conserve at least 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas...<br /> 14.b Provide access for small-scale artisanal fishers to marine resources and markets</p> <p><b>Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss</b><br /> 15.1 ...ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands...<br /> 15.2 ...promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation...<br /> 15.3 ...combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought and floods...<br /> 15.4 ...ensure the conservation of mountain ecosystems, including their biodiversity...<br /> 15.5 Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity...<br /> 15.9 ...integrate ecosystem and biodiversity values into... local planning<br /> 15.c Enhance... efforts to combat poaching... by increasing the capacity of local communities to pursue sustainable livelihood opportunities</p> <p><b>Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions...</b><br /> 16.1 Significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates...<br /> 16.2 End abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against and torture of children<br /> 16.3 Promote the rule of law... and ensure equal access to justice for all<br /> 16.5 Substantially reduce corruption and bribery in all their forms<br /> 16.6 Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions...<br /> 16.7 Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making...<br /> 16.9 ...provide legal identity for all, including birth registration<br /> 16.10 Ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms...<br /> 16.b Promote and enforce non-discriminatory laws and policies for sustainable development</p> <p><b>Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation...</b><br /> 17.1 Strengthen domestic resource mobilization...<br /> 17.7 Promote the development, transfer, dissemination and diffusion of environmentally sound technologies...<br /> 17.17 Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships...</p> <p><small>REFERENCE: Dahl, Arthur Lyon. 2016. Looking at the Sustainable Development Goals from the Bottom Up. Paper presented at the International Environment Forum 20th International Conference, Nur University, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia, 7 October 2016. <a href="https://iefworld.org/ddahl16j">https://iefworld.org/ddahl16j</a></small></p> <hr /> <p id="Individuals" style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">AN INDIVIDUAL VIEW OF SDGs</p> <p><i>Selected SDG targets are rewritten as something any individual can set as a personal goal (with the relevant target numbers in parentheses).</i></p> <p><b>Goal 1. No poverty</b><br /> Contribute to local efforts to eliminate poverty in your community (1.1, 1.2 end poverty)</p> <p><b>Goal 2. Zero hunger</b><br /> Support community efforts to ensure everyone access to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round (2.1, 2.2 ensure access to food, end malnutrition)<br /> Encourage and support local small-scale food producers (2.3 small-scale food producers)<br /> Support sustainable food production systems that improve land and soil quality (2.4 sustainable food production systems)</p> <p><b>Goal 3. Good health and well-being</b><br /> Choose a healthy lifestyle for yourself and your family (3.4 non-communicable diseases, mental health and well-being)<br /> Avoid narcotic drugs and harmful use of alcohol (3.5 substance abuse)<br /> Drive safely (3.6 road traffic accidents)<br /> Plan your family size (3.7 family planning)<br /> Avoid using hazardous chemicals, try not to live in polluted areas (3.9 hazardous chemicals; air, water and soil pollution)</p> <p><b>Goal 4. Quality education</b><br /> Get the best education possible, and educate your children (4.1 primary and secondary education) (4.3 technical, vocational and tertiary education)<br /> Give your small children pre-primary education (4.2 pre-primary education)<br /> Help others to get skills for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship (4.4 technical and vocational skills for youth and adults)<br /> Encourage education for girls and the vulnerable (4.5 gender disparities, equal access to education)<br /> Educate yourself, your family and community about sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity (4.7 education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles)</p> <p><b>Goal 5. Gender equality</b><br /> Avoid discriminating against women and girls (5.1 discrimination against all women and girls)<br /> Shun violence against women and girls (5.2 violence against all women and girls)<br /> Share responsibility within your household and family (5.4 domestic work and shared responsibility)<br /> Encourage women's participation in leadership and decision-making (5.5 women's participation)<br /> Support women's equal rights (5.a women's equal rights to economic resources and property)<br /> Promote the empowerment of women with technology (5.b enabling technology for women)</p> <p><b>Goal 6. Clean water and sanitation</b><br /> Encourage safe drinking water and sanitation, practice good hygiene (6.1 safe drinking water) (6.2 sanitation and hygiene)<br /> Avoid polluting water (6.3 water quality)<br /> Use water efficiently (6.4 water-use efficiency)<br /> Contribute to improving water and sanitation in your community (6.b participation of local communities in water and sanitation management)</p> <p><b>Goal 7. Affordable and clean energy</b><br /> Prefer renewable energy sources (7.2 renewable energy)<br /> Use energy efficiently (7.3 energy efficiency)</p> <p><b>Goal 8. Decent work and economic growth</b><br /> Consider a career in a sustainable productive activity involving creativity and innovation (8.3 productive activities)<br /> See your work and that of others as a service to the community (8.5 employment and decent work)<br /> Help young people to find training and employment (8.6 youth employment)<br /> Encourage all workers' rights to a safe and secure working environment, including migrants (8.8 labour rights)</p> <p><b>Goal 9. Industry, innovation and infrastructure</b><br /> Work to improve your local community infrastructure (9.1 sustainable infrastructure)<br /> Look for ways to make your workplace more resource-efficient and sustainable (9.4 sustainable industries)<br /> Learn to use information and communications technologies and help others (9.c access to information technology)</p> <p><b>Goal 10. Reduced inequalities</b><br /> Participate in the life of your community, and empower others irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status (10.2 social, economic and political inclusion)<br /> Support equal opportunities for everyone in the community (10.3 equal opportunity)<br /> Be welcoming to migrants, since you may also migrate (10.7 responsible migration)</p> <p><b>Goal 11. Sustainable cities and communities</b><br /> Choose your housing to be safe and sustainable (11.1 housing and basic services)<br /> Use sustainable forms of transport (11.2 sustainable transport)<br /> Participate in the sustainability planning of your local community (11.3 sustainable urbanization and participatory human settlement planning)<br /> Protect your local cultural and natural heritage (11.4 cultural and natural heritage)<br /> Reduce your vulnerability to disasters (11.5 disasters)<br /> Contribute to community gardens and green spaces (11.7 green and public spaces)</p> <p><b>Goal 12. Responsible consumption and production</b><br /> Consider sustainable natural resource use in your purchases (12.2 sustainable natural resource use)<br /> Stop wasting food (12.3 food waste)<br /> Reduce your use and release of chemicals (12.4 environmentally sound management of chemicals)<br /> Reduce your wastes through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse (12.5 reduce waste generation)<br /> Inform yourself, and help to educate others about sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature (12.8 information and awareness)</p> <p><b>Goal 13. Climate action</b><br /> Educate yourself and others about climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning (13.3 climate change education)</p> <p><b>Goal 14. Life below water</b><br /> Reduce your use of plastics and dispose of them responsibly (14.1 marine pollution and marine debris)<br /> If you live near the coast, support coastal protection (14.2, 14.5 marine and coastal ecosystems)</p> <p><b>Goal 15. Life on land</b><br /> Support the conservation and sustainable use of terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems, especially forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands (15.1 terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems)<br /> Use paper, wood and charcoal from sustainable forestry (15.2 sustainable management forests)<br /> Protect local natural habitats and biodiversity (15.5 natural habitats and biodiversity)</p> <p><b>Goal 16. Peace, justice and strong institutions</b><br /> Avoid all violence (16.1 violence)<br /> Protect children from abuse (16.2 abuse of children)<br /> Fight local corruption (16.5 corruption and bribery)<br /> Demand accountability and transparency from your local institutions (16.6 accountable and transparent institutions)<br /> Participate in local decision-making (16.7 participatory and representative decision-making)<br /> Avoid all discrimination in your community (16.b non-discriminatory laws and policies)</p> <p><b>Goal 17. Partnerships for the goals</b><br /> Contribute time and resources to local sustainability efforts (17.1 domestic resource mobilization)<br /> Invent, adopt and share environmentally sound technologies (17.7 environmentally sound technologies)<br /> Join in local partnerships for sustainability (17.17 public, public-private and civil society partnerships)</p> <p><small>REFERENCE: Dahl, Arthur Lyon. 2016j. Looking at the Sustainable Development Goals from the Bottom Up. Paper presented at the International Environment Forum 20th International Conference, Nur University, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia, 7 October 2016. <a href="https://iefworld.org/ddahl16j">https://iefworld.org/ddahl16j</a></small></p> <hr /> <p id="Business" style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">SDGs AND TARGETS RELEVANT TO BUSINESS</p> <p><i>This list selects those SDG targets to which businesses can contribute as part of their economic and social action.</i></p> <p><b>Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere</b><br /> 1.1 By 2030, eradicate extreme poverty for all people everywhere...<br /> 1.2 By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions...<br /> 1.4 By 2030, ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources,... natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including micro finance</p> <p><b>Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture</b><br /> 2.1 By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round<br /> 2.3 By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment<br /> 2.4 By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality<br /> 2.a Increase investment, including through enhanced international cooperation, in rural infrastructure, agricultural research and extension services, technology development and plant and livestock gene banks...<br /> 2.b Correct and prevent trade restrictions and distortions in world agricultural markets...<br /> 2.c Adopt measures to ensure the proper functioning of food commodity markets... and facilitate timely access to market information, including on food reserves, in order to help limit extreme food price volatility</p> <p><b>Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages</b><br /> 3.4 By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being<br /> 3.8 Achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all<br /> 3.9 By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination<br /> 3.b Support the research and development of vaccines and medicines for the communicable and noncommunicable diseases that primarily affect developing countries, provide access to affordable essential medicines and vaccines,... and... provide access to medicines for all</p> <p><b>Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all</b><br /> 4.3 By 2030, ensure equal access for all women and men to affordable and quality technical, vocational and tertiary education, including university<br /> 4.4 By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship<br /> 4.5 By 2030, eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable...<br /> 4.7 By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture's contribution to sustainable development</p> <p><b>Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls</b><br /> 5.1 End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere<br /> 5.5 Ensure women's full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life<br /> S.b Enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology, to promote the empowerment of women</p> <p><b>Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all</b><br /> 6.3 By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally<br /> 6.4 By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity...<br /> 6.a By 2030, expand international cooperation and capacity-building support to developing countries in water- and sanitation-related activities and programmes, including water harvesting, desalination, water efficiency, wastewater treatment, recycling and reuse technologies</p> <p><b>Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all</b><br /> 7.1 By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services<br /> 7.2 By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix<br /> 7.3 By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency<br /> 7.a By 2030, enhance international cooperation to facilitate access to clean energy research and technology, including renewable energy, energy efficiency and advanced and cleaner fossil-fuel technology, and promote investment in energy infrastructure and clean energy technology</p> <p><b>Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all</b><br /> 8.2 Achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation, including through a focus on high-value added and labour-intensive sectors<br /> 8.3 Promote development-oriented policies that support productive activities, decent job creation, entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation, and encourage the formalization and growth of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises, including through access to financial services<br /> 8.4 Improve progressively. through 2030, global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation...<br /> 8.5 By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value<br /> 8.6 By 2020, substantially reduce the proportion of youth not in employment, education or training<br /> 8.8 Protect labour rights and promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment 8.9 By 2030. devise and implement policies to promote sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products<br /> 8.10 Strengthen the capacity of domestic financial institutions to encourage and expand access to banking, insurance and financial services for all</p> <p><b>Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation</b><br /> 9.2 Promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and, by 2030, significantly raise industry's share of employment and gross domestic product...<br /> 9.3 Increase the access of small-scale industrial and other enterprises, in particular in developing countries, to financial services, including affordable credit, and their integration into value chains and markets<br /> 9.4 By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes...<br /> 9.5 Enhance scientific research, upgrade the technological capabilities of industrial sectors in all countries...<br /> 9.b Support domestic technology development, research and innovation in developing countries, including by ensuring a conducive policy environment for, inter alia, industrial diversification and value addition to commodities<br /> 9.c Significantly increase access to information and communications technology and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in least developed countries by 2020</p> <p><b>Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries</b><br /> 10.1 By 2030, progressively achieve and sustain income growth of the bottom 40 per cent of the population at a rate higher than the national average<br /> 10.2 By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status<br /> 10.3 Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome...<br /> 10.5 Improve the regulation and monitoring of global financial markets and institutions and strengthen the implementation of such regulations<br /> 10.7 Facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies</p> <p><b>Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable</b><br /> 11.1 By 2030, ensure access for all to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic services and upgrade slums<br /> 11.2 By 2030, provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons<br /> 11.3 By 2030, enhance inclusive and sustainable urbanization and capacity for participatory, integrated and sustainable human settlement planning and management...<br /> 11.4 Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world's cultural and natural heritage<br /> 11.6 By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management<br /> 11.7 By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces...</p> <p><b>Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns</b><br /> 12.1 Implement the 10-year framework of programmes on sustainable consumption and production...<br /> 12.2 By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources<br /> 12.3 By 2030, halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reduce food losses along production and supply chains, including post-harvest losses<br /> 12.4 By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle..., and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil...<br /> 12.5 By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse<br /> 12.6 Encourage companies, especially large and transnational companies, to adopt sustainable practices and to integrate sustainability information into their reporting cycle<br /> 12.8 By 2030, ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature<br /> 12.b Develop and implement tools to monitor sustainable development impacts for sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products<br /> 12.c Rationalize inefficient fossil-fuel subsidies that encourage wasteful consumption by removing market distortions,... including by restructuring taxation and phasing out those harmful subsidies, where they exist...</p> <p><b>Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts</b><br /> 13.3 Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning</p> <p><b>Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development</b><br /> 14.1 By 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution<br /> 14.4 By 2020, effectively regulate harvesting and end overfishing, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and destructive fishing practices...<br /> 14.6 By 2020, prohibit certain forms of fisheries subsidies which contribute to overcapacity and overfishing, eliminate subsidies that contribute to illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and refrain from introducing new such subsidies...</p> <p><b>Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss</b><br /> 15.1 By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands...<br /> 15.2 By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally<br /> 15.3 By 2030, combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought and floods...<br /> 15.4 By 2030, ensure the conservation of mountain ecosystems, including their biodiversity...<br /> 15.5 Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species<br /> 15.6 Promote fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and promote appropriate access to such resources...</p> <p><b>Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels</b><br /> 16.5 Substantially reduce corruption and bribery in all their forms<br /> 16.6 Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels<br /> 16.10 Ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms...</p> <p><b>Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development</b><br /> <i>Finance</i><br /> 17.3 Mobilize additional financial resources for developing countries from multiple sources<br /> 17.5 Adopt and implement investment promotion regimes for least developed countries<br /> <i>Technology</i><br /> 17.6 Enhance North-South, South-South and triangular regional and international cooperation on and access to science, technology and innovation and enhance knowledge sharing...<br /> 17.7 Promote the development, transfer, dissemination and diffusion of environmentally sound technologies to developing countries on favourable terms, including on concessional and preferential terms...<br /> <i>Capacity-building</i><br /> 17.9 Enhance international support for implementing effective and targeted capacity-building in developing countries to support national plans to implement all the sustainable development goals, including through North-South, South-South and triangular cooperation<br /> <i>Trade</i><br /> 17.10 Promote a universal, rules-based, open, non-discriminatory and equitable multilateral trading system under the World Trade Organization<br /> <i><b>Systemic issues</b></i><br /> <i>Policy and institutional coherence</i><br /> 17.13 Enhance global macroeconomic stability, including through policy coordination and policy coherence<br /> <i>Multi-stakeholder partnerships</i><br /> 17.16 Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources...<br /> 17.17 Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships<br /> <i>Data, monitoring and accountability</i><br /> 17.18 By 2020, enhance capacity-building support to developing countries... to increase significantly the availability of high-quality, timely and reliable data disaggregated by income, gender, age, race, ethnicity, migratory status, disability, geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts<br /> 17.19 By 2030, build on existing initiatives to develop measurements of progress on sustainable development that complement gross domestic product...</p> <p><small>REFERENCE: Dahl, Arthur Lyon, 2016. The 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals: Challenges and Opportunities for Business. Paper presented at the Vision Gulf Business Conference, Kuwait, 31 May 2016. <a href="https://iefworld.org/ddahl16d">https://iefworld.org/ddahl16d</a></small></p> <hr /> <p id="Bahai" style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">A BAHA'I CONTRIBUTION TO THE SDGs</p> <p><i>The following compilation includes a relevant quotation from the Baha'i writings or statements of the Baha'i International Community for each of the SDGs (<a href="#Dahl2016">Dahl 2016</a>)</i></p> <p><b>Goal 1. No poverty</b></p> <p>Poverty can be described as the absence of those ethical, social and material resources needed to develop the moral, intellectual and social capacities of individuals, communities and institutions.... the goal at hand is not only to remove the ills of poverty but to engage the masses of humanity in the construction of a just global order. (<a href="#BIC2008a">BIC 2008a</a>)</p> <p>The technologies and resources exist to meet the basic needs of humanity and to eliminate poverty. Equity in the use of these technologies and resources, however, will come about only with certain understandings and commitments. While individuals must do their utmost to provide for themselves and their dependents, the community must accept responsibility, when necessary, to help meet basic needs. (<a href="#BIC1998">BIC 1998</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 2. Zero hunger</b></p> <p>The economics of food production and distribution will have to be reoriented and the critical role of the farmer in food and economic security properly valued. (<a href="#BIC1998">BIC 1998</a>)</p> <p>Food production and agriculture is the world's single largest source of employment.... Agriculture still represents the fundamental basis of economic and community life: malnourishment and food insecurity suffocate all attempts at development and progress.... The farmer must be accorded his or her rightful place in the processes of development and civilization building: as the villages are reconstructed, the cities will follow. (<a href="#BIC2008a">BIC 2008a</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 3. Good health and well-being</b></p> <p>With regard to health – the physical, spiritual, mental and social well-being of the individual – access to clean water, shelter, and some form of cheap energy would go a long way toward eradicating the problems that currently plague vast numbers of individuals and communities. (<a href="#BIC1998">BIC 1998</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 4. Quality education</b></p> <p>Education must be lifelong. It should help people to develop the knowledge, values, attitudes and skills necessary to earn a livelihood and to contribute confidently and constructively to shaping communities that reflect principles of justice, equity and unity. It should also help the individual develop a sense of place and community, grounded in the local, but embracing the whole world. Successful education will cultivate virtue as the foundation for personal and collective well-being, and will nurture in individuals a deep sense of service and an active commitment to the welfare of their families, their communities, their countries, indeed, all mankind. (<a href="#BIC1998">BIC 1998</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 5. Gender equality</b></p> <p>One of the most pervasive social challenges besetting communities around the world is the marginalization of girls and women.... Their responsibilities in families, in communities, as farmers and as stewards of natural resources make them uniquely positioned to develop strategies for adapting to changing environmental conditions. Women's distinct knowledge and needs complement those of men, and must be duly considered in all arenas of community decision-making. (<a href="#BIC2008b">BIC 2008b</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 6. Clean water and sanitation</b></p> <p>Wash ye every soiled thing with water that hath undergone no alteration.... Be ye the very essence of cleanliness amongst mankind.</p> <p>Immerse yourselves in clean water; it is not permissible to bathe yourselves in water that hath already been used. (<a href="#BahaullahAqdas">Bahá'u'lláh: The Kitáb-i-Aqdas</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 7. Affordable and clean energy</b></p> <p>A world federal system... bent on the exploitation of all the available sources of energy on the surface of the planet... (<a href="#SEWOB">Shoghi Effendi 1936</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 8. Decent work and economic growth</b></p> <p>Society must develop new economic models... furthering a dynamic, just and thriving social order. Such economic systems will be strongly altruistic and cooperative in nature; they will provide meaningful employment and will help to eradicate poverty in the world. (<a href="#BIC1998">BIC 1998</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 9. Industry, innovation and infrastructure</b></p> <p>The owners of properties, mines and factories should share their incomes with their employees and give a fairly certain percentage of their products to their workingmen in order that the employees may receive, beside their wages, some of the general income of the factory (<a href="#AbdulBaha">'Abdu'l-Bahá</a>)</p> <p>The dominant model of development depends on a society of vigorous consumers of material goods.... This preoccupation with the production and accumulation of material objects and comforts... has consolidated itself in the structures of power and information to the exclusion of competing voices and paradigms. The unfettered cultivation of needs and wants has led to a system fully dependent on excessive consumption for a privileged few, while reinforcing exclusion, poverty and inequality, for the majority. (<a href="#BIC2010">BIC 2010</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 10. Reduced inequalities</b></p> <p>All too many of these ideologies...callously abandon starving millions to the operations of a market system that all too clearly is aggravating the plight of the majority of mankind, while enabling small sections to live in a condition of affluence scarcely dreamed of by our forebears.... Why is the vast majority of the world's peoples sinking ever deeper into hunger and wretchedness when wealth on a scale undreamed of... is at the disposal of the present arbiters of human affairs? (<a href="#UHJ1985">UHJ 1985</a>)</p> <p>It is the concentration of wealth in the hands of the few that is in urgent need of attention. (<a href="#BIC2008a">BIC 2008a</a>&gt;)</p> <p><b>Goal 11. Sustainable cities and communities</b></p> <p>Our challenge... is to redesign and develop our communities around those universal principles -- including love, honesty, moderation, humility, hospitality, justice and unity -- which promote social cohesion, and without which no community, no matter how economically prosperous, intellectually endowed or technologically advanced, can long endure. (<a href="#BIC1996">BIC 1996</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 12. Responsible consumption and production</b></p> <p>Take from this world only to the measure of your needs, and forego that which exceedeth them. (<a href="#BahaullahSummons">Bahá'u'lláh</a>)</p> <p>Sustainable production is not simply about ‘greener’ technology but rather, should involve systems that enable all human beings to contribute to the productive process. In such a system, all are producers, and all have the opportunity to earn (or receive, if unable to earn) enough to meet their needs.</p> <p>The concept of justice is embodied in the recognition that the interests of the individual and of the wider community are inextricably linked....</p> <p>Ultimately, the transformation required to shift towards sustainable consumption and production will entail no less than an organic change in the structure of society itself so as to reflect fully the interdependence of the entire social body—as well as the interconnectedness with the natural world that sustains it. (<a href="#BIC2010">BIC 2010</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 13. Climate action</b></p> <p>Much has been said about the need for cooperation to solve a climate challenge that no nation or community can solve alone. The principle of the oneness of humankind... seeks to... anchor the aspirations of individuals, communities and nations to those of the progress of humanity.... As children, women, men, religious and scientific communities as well as governments and international institutions converge on this reality, we will do more than achieve a collective response to the climate change crisis. We will usher in a new paradigm by means of which we can understand our purpose and responsibilities in an interconnected world.... (<a href="#BIC2008b">BIC 2008b</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 14. Life below water</b></p> <p>A world federal system, ruling the whole earth and exercising unchallengeable authority over its unimaginably vast resources.... A world legislature... will... ultimately control the entire resources of all the component nations.... The economic resources of the world will be organized, its sources of raw materials will be tapped and fully utilized, its markets will be coordinated and developed, and the distribution of its products will be equitably regulated. (<a href="#SEWOB">Shoghi Effendi 1936</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 15. Life on land</b></p> <p>In light of the interdependence of all parts of nature, and the importance of evolution and diversity "to the beauty, efficiency and perfection of the whole," every effort should be made to preserve as much as possible the earth's bio-diversity and natural order.</p> <p>As trustees, or stewards, of the planet's vast resources and biological diversity, humanity must learn to make use of the earth's natural resources, both renewable and non-renewable, in a manner that ensures sustainability and equity into the distant reaches of time. (<a href="#BIC1998">BIC 1998</a>)</p> <p><b>Goal 16. Peace, justice and strong institutions<br /> Goal 17. Partnerships for the goals</b></p> <p>The pathway to sustainability will be one of empowerment, collaboration and continual processes of questioning, learning and action in all regions of the world. It will be shaped by the experiences of women, men, children, the rich, the poor, the governors and the governed as each one is enabled to play their rightful role in the construction of a new society. As the sweeping tides of consumerism, unfettered consumption, extreme poverty and marginalization recede, they will reveal the human capacities for justice, reciprocity and happiness. (<a href="#BIC2010">BIC 2010</a>)</p> <p><small>REFERENCE: Dahl, Arthur Lyon. 2016. Looking at the Sustainable Development Goals from the Bottom Up. Paper presented at the International Environment Forum 20th International Conference, Nur University, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia, 7 October 2016. <a href="https://iefworld.org/ddahl16j">https://iefworld.org/ddahl16j</a> </small></p> <hr /> <p style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);"><small>REFERENCES CITED</small></p> <p id="AbdulBaha"><small>'Abdu'l-Bahá. 1945. <i>Foundations of World Unity</i>. Wilmette, Illinois: Baha'i Publishing Trust.</small></p> <p id="BIC1996"><small>Bahá'í International Community. 1996. <i>Sustainable Communities in an Integrating World</i>. A statement presented to the Plenary of the Second UN Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II), 7 June 1996, Istanbul, Turkey. <a href="https://www.bic.org/statements/sustainable-communities-integrating-world">https://www.bic.org/statements/sustainable-communities-integrating-world</a></small></p> <p id="BIC1998"><small>Bahá'í International Community. 1998. <i>Valuing Spirituality in Development: Initial Considerations Regarding the Creation of Spiritually Based Indicators for Development</i>. A concept paper written for the World Faiths and Development Dialogue, Lambeth Palace, London, 18-19 February 1998. Bahá'í Publishing Trust, London. <a href="https://www.bic.org/statements/valuing-spirituality-development">https://www.bic.org/statements/valuing-spirituality-development</a> and <a href="http://iefworld.org/bicvsid.htm">http://iefworld.org/bicvsid.htm</a></small></p> <p id="BIC2008a"><small>Bahá'í International Community. 2008a. <i>Eradicating Poverty: Moving Forward As One</i>. <a href="https://www.bic.org/statements/eradicating-poverty-moving-forward-one">https://www.bic.org/statements/eradicating-poverty-moving-forward-one</a> and <a href="http://iefworld.org/bicpoverty.htm">http://iefworld.org/bicpoverty.htm</a> and <a href="http://iefworld.org/bicpoverty.htm">http://iefworld.org/bicpoverty.htm</a></small></p> <p id="BIC2008b"><small>Bahá'í International Community. 2008b. <i>Seizing the Opportunity: Redefining the Challenge of Climate Change</i>. Statement presented at COP14, Poznan 2008. <a href="https://www.bic.org/statements/seizing-opportunity-redefining-challenge-climate-change">https://www.bic.org/statements/seizing-opportunity-redefining-challenge…</a></small></p> <p id="BIC2010"><small>Bahá'í International Community. 2010. <i>Rethinking Prosperity: Forging Alternatives to a Culture of Consumerism</i>. Bahá'í International Community's Contribution to the 18th Session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development, 3 May 2010. <a href="https://www.bic.org/statements/rethinking-prosperity-forging-alternatives-culture-consumerism">https://www.bic.org/statements/rethinking-prosperity-forging-alternativ…</a></small></p> <p id="BahaullahAqdas"><small>Bahá'u'lláh. 1992. <i>The Kitáb-i-Aqdas: The Most Holy Book</i>. Haifa: Bahá'í World Centre</small></p> <p id="BahaullahSummons"><small>Bahá'u'lláh. 2002. <i>The Summons of the Lord of Hosts: Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh</i>. Haifa: Bahá'í World Centre. </small></p> <p id="Dahl2016"><small>Dahl, Arthur Lyon. 2016. Using the new UN 2030 Agenda to work for justice at the local level. Paper presented at the 21st Justice Conference, de Poort, the Netherlands, 25-27 March 2016, on the theme "Justice In Action: From Local to Global". <a href="http://iefworld.org/ddahl16b">http://iefworld.org/ddahl16b</a></small></p> <p id="SEWOB"><small>Shoghi Effendi. 1936. <i>The World Order of Bahá'u'lláh</i>. Wilmette, Illinois: Bahá'í Publishing Trust, 1938.</small></p> <p id="UN2015"><small>United Nations. 2015. <i>Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development</i>. Outcome document of the Summit for the adoption of the Post-2015 Development Agenda, New York, 25-27 September 2015. A/70/L.1. New York: United Nations. <a href="http://www.un.org/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A/70/L.1&amp;Lang=E">http://www.un.org/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A/70/L.1&amp;Lang=E</a></small></p> <p id="UHJ1985"><small>Universal House of Justice. 1985. <i>The Promise of World Peace</i>. Haifa: Bahá'í World Centre.</small></p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><small><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="http://iefworld.org/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></small></p> <p><small><small>Last updated 12 June 2017</small></small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Mon, 12 Jun 2017 15:35:37 +0000 admin 882 at http://iefworld.org http://iefworld.org/node/882#comments