International Environment Forum - A Bahá'í inspired organization for environment and sustainability http://iefworld.org/rss.xml en Leaves - April IEF newsletter is available http://iefworld.org/node/255 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Leaves - April IEF newsletter is available</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">15. April 2019 - 22:40</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Read on line: <a href="/newslt118"><strong><em>Leaves</em></strong> 21(4) April 2019</a> light text version with fewer illustrations.<br /> Download as a <a href="/fl/IEF_Leaves190415.pdf">pdf version</a> [0.9 mb].</p> <table background="/gr/BLEAF1.JPG" style="background-color: rgb(0, 153, 0); width: 100%; height: 55px; text-align: left; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Mon, 15 Apr 2019 19:40:52 +0000 admin 255 at http://iefworld.org http://iefworld.org/node/255#comments 23rd IEF Annual Conference http://iefworld.org/conf23 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">23rd IEF Annual Conference</span> <div class="field field--name-field-dates field--type-string-long field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Dates</div> <div class="field__item">2019 April 5-14</div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-place field--type-string-long field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Place</div> <div class="field__item">Auckland and Rotorua, New Zealand</div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">14. April 2019 - 14:29</span> Sun, 14 Apr 2019 11:29:02 +0000 admin 965 at http://iefworld.org Human Rights and Environment http://iefworld.org/ddahl19a <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Human Rights and Environment</span> <div class="field field--name-field-author field--type-string-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Author</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item">Dahl, Arthur Lyon</div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-year field--type-integer field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Year</div> <div class="field__item">2019</div> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/index.php/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Arthur Dahl</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">29. March 2019 - 15:57</span> Fri, 29 Mar 2019 13:57:48 +0000 Arthur Dahl 972 at http://iefworld.org UNECE Regional Forum on Sustainable Development http://iefworld.org/node/971 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">UNECE Regional Forum on Sustainable Development</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">27. March 2019 - 11:46</span> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/62" hreflang="en">Sustainable Development</a></div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">UNECE Regional Forum on Sustainable Development</h2> <p>The IEF participated in the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Regional Forum on Sustainable Development in Geneva on 21-22 March 2019, and in the Civil Society Pre-Meeting to the Forum on 20-21 March. Both Victoria Thoresen and Arthur Dahl attended the Pre-Meeting, and Arthur was accredited for IEF as one of 800 participants in the UNECE Regional Forum.</p> <p><img alt="UNECE Regional Forum" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/RFSD190322_7.jpg" style="width: 333px; height: 205px;" /></p> <p>At the Civil Society Pre-meeting in the Palais des Nations, representatives from all the major groups and other stakeholders discussed the implementation and monitoring of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the role of civil society in United Nations processes on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and joint advocacy messages that they would deliver to the intergovernmental Regional Forum. Working groups considered each of the SDGs under review this year at the High Level Political Forum (HLPF) next July, as well as the process of Voluntary National Reviews that governments prepare for presentation at the HLPF.</p> <p>The Regional Forum consisted of plenary sessions, focus events for dialogues on pressing questions of "Technology, Digitalization, Artificial Intelligence - Curse or Blessing for Sustainable Development" and "How to Measure Progress? Data and Statistics for SDGs", and round tables on SDG 4 (Quality Education), SDG 8 (Decent work and economic growth), SDG 10 (Reduced inequalities), SDG 13 (Climate action), and SDG 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions).</p> <p>One significant feature of the events was the strong predominance of women on the podium, with usually only one token man. The Chair of the Forum was Albanian Minister of Health and Social Protection Ogerta Manastirliu, who noted that more than half of their Cabinet was female. UNECE Executive Secretary Olga Algayerove was active throughout the forum. In her opening keynote, UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed said that we are off track in implementing the 2030 Agenda, and more ambition is needed. With the rural/urban divide and so many unemployed young, a quarter of the region's population is are risk of poverty. The gender gap remains. Greenhouse gas emissions per capita are much higher, making it harder to meet the Paris goals. She said it was our duty to the marching children to move with greater speed.</p> <p>Many government delegations shared their successes and difficulties, with progress on laws and policies, but frequent failures with implementation. Having an independent ombudsman to investigate such failures was useful. Human rights mechanisms were also helpful, since the SDGs corresponded to many human rights.</p> <p>In the focus event on information technology, it was noted that half the world population is not yet on line, and reaching them would require addressing affordable access, training in appropriate skills, and building trust in the system and in the information it conveys. There was potential to promote health, reduce transaction costs, and make agriculture more efficient, but a new regulatory framework founded on ethical principles was needed to catch up with the rapidly evolving technology.</p> <p>The focus event on measuring progress cited advances in opening up data bases to public access, but challenges in disaggregating data to capture the poorest, the most marginalized, children, Roma, migrants and others most often left behind. There are indicators of outcomes, but not many that measure progress to highlight where more effort is needed.</p> <p>In the closing keynote, Eeva Furman of Finland gave a preview of the UN Global Sustainable Development Report to be issued on 15 May 2019, of which she is one of the principal authors. It applies systems thinking to look at SDG interactions by transnational flows. While there are many synergies between SDGs, there are also challenging trade-offs. The report will review six areas for systemic transformations: human potential and well-being, sustainable economies, energy decarbonisation and access, food and nutrition, urban and peri-urban development, and securing the global commons. It explores pathways and levers for transformation, and highlights the need for sustainability science and science capacity worldwide. This will be something to look forward to in May.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 27 March 2019</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Wed, 27 Mar 2019 09:46:56 +0000 admin 971 at http://iefworld.org IEF Annual Report 2018-2019 http://iefworld.org/report2019 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">IEF Annual Report 2018-2019</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/index.php/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">20. March 2019 - 22:45</span> <div class="field field--name-field-ar-year field--type-string field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Report Year</div> <div class="field__item">2018-2019</div> </div> Wed, 20 Mar 2019 20:45:17 +0000 admin 970 at http://iefworld.org Equality for Women = Prosperity for All (book review) http://iefworld.org/node/966 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Equality for Women = Prosperity for All (book review)</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Arthur Dahl</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">12. February 2019 - 18:21</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Equality for Women = Prosperity for All:<br /> The Disastrous Global Crisis of Gender Inequality</h2> <p>By Augusto López-Claros and Bahiyyih Nakhjavani<br /> New York: St. Martin's Press. 312 p.</p> <p>Book review by Arthur Dahl</p> </div> <p>When a distinguished economist, who headed the unit at the World Bank producing the "<i>Women, Business and the Law</i>" reports, gets together with a well-known Bahá'í author of books such as "<i>The Woman Who Read Too Much</i>" to write about gender inequality, the result is bound to be outstanding. Their new book (October 2018) is a remarkable analysis of all the reasons why gender discrimination is bad for society, with an emphasis on its economic costs. They demonstrate convincingly, citing many research findings, that the resulting social and political disparities are behind endemic poverty and violence, individual frustration, social instability and cultural disaffection. The more freedoms are given to women, the greater the resulting prosperity for all.</p> <p>The first chapter explores the demographic dimension of the gender issue, including the women missing due to son preference, and the fact that we frequently ignore or deny rights to half the world population (the female half). This then leads into a disturbing review of violence against women in all its forms, often hidden or protected by family and labour law.</p> <p>One of the most significant forms of discrimination against women is in the world of work, starting with beliefs that the place of women is only in the home and raising children. Even when they do go out to work, it is often in the menial and least-paid jobs. Many countries had, and often still have, laws prohibiting women in certain professions. Then there is the "glass ceiling" preventing women from accessing higher levels of responsibility and managerial positions. Even when the laws are changed, practices are slow to follow. The consequences of the exclusion of women from the economy are analysed in some detail, demonstrating how significant is the economic impact.</p> <p>In analysing the culture question, the book considers the barriers erected by religious interpretations of gender roles and the arguments of cultural exceptionalism that deny the universality of human rights, dissecting the many ways that an unjustified sense of male superiority and the defence of male power hide behind questionable interpretations of scripture and culture, making women who try to improve their lot the victims of cultural crimes.</p> <p>In its analysis of the legal approaches to gender, the book explores the impact of international conventions and the evolution of civil law, common law and traditional forms of law on women's mobility, and their marital and inheritance rights. The long struggle for female suffrage and the right to vote is only beginning to be reflected in women taking on legislative and political responsibilities. Behind all of this is the role of education, particularly of girls, but also more generally to overcome gender stereotypes in society. There are still movements that see education of girls as such a threat that they resort to kidnapping, rape and murder to prevent it. The authors demonstrate the benefits of providing education to girls, and the costs of denying it, with 500 million women still illiterate today.</p> <p>Finally, the book adds up the costs of inequality, with systems of governance that license injustice, and identifies the kinds of laws that must be changed to uphold women's rights, guarantee their security, and improve their access to education and employment. One could not ask for better justifications for guaranteeing equality to women in order to achieve prosperity for all.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 12 February 2019</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-blog-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Blog tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/284" hreflang="en">Gender equality</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 12 Feb 2019 16:21:26 +0000 Arthur Dahl 966 at http://iefworld.org Global Compact for Migration http://iefworld.org/node/963 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Global Compact for Migration</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">13. January 2019 - 15:34</span> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/200" hreflang="en">Migration</a></div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Global Compact for Migration</h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>An Intergovernmental Conference was held on 10-11 December 2018 in Marrakech, Morocco where 164 UN Member States adopted the <b>Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration</b>. On 19 December, the United Nations General Assembly officially endorsed the Global Compact, described by UN chief António Guterres as a “roadmap to prevent suffering and chaos”. There were 152 votes in favour, 12 abstentions, and five votes against, namely by the Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, Poland, and the United States of America. An additional 24 Member States were not present to take part in the vote.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Global Compact for Migration is the first-ever UN global agreement on a common approach to international migration in all its dimensions. The global compact is non-legally binding. It is grounded in values of state sovereignty, responsibility-sharing, non-discrimination, and human rights, and recognizes that a cooperative approach is needed to optimize the overall benefits of migration, while addressing its risks and challenges for individuals and communities in countries of origin, transit and destination.</p> <p>The compact:<br /> - aims to mitigate the adverse drivers and structural factors that hinder people from building and maintaining sustainable livelihoods in their countries of origin;<br /> - intends to reduce the risks and vulnerabilities migrants face at different stages of migration by respecting, protecting and fulfilling their human rights and providing them with care and assistance;<br /> - seeks to address the legitimate concerns of states and communities, while recognizing that societies are undergoing demographic, economic, social and environmental changes at different scales that may have implications for and result from migration;<br /> - strives to create conducive conditions that enable all migrants to enrich our societies through their human, economic and social capacities, and thus facilitate their contributions to sustainable development at the local, national, regional and global levels.</p> <p>The global compact comprises <b>23 Objectives for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration</b> for better managing migration at local, national, regional and global levels.</p> <p>(1) Collect and utilize accurate and disaggregated data as a basis for evidence-based policies<br /> (2) Minimize the adverse drivers and structural factors that compel people to leave their country of origin<br /> (3) Provide accurate and timely information at all stages of migration<br /> (4) Ensure that all migrants have proof of legal identity and adequate documentation<br /> (5) Enhance availability and flexibility of pathways for regular migration<br /> (6) Facilitate fair and ethical recruitment and safeguard conditions that ensure decent work<br /> (7) Address and reduce vulnerabilities in migration<br /> (8) Save lives and establish coordinated international efforts on missing migrants<br /> (9) Strengthen the transnational response to smuggling of migrants<br /> (10) Prevent, combat and eradicate trafficking in persons in the context of international migration<br /> (11) Manage borders in an integrated, secure and coordinated manner<br /> (12) Strengthen certainty and predictability in migration procedures for appropriate screening, assessment and referral<br /> (13) Use migration detention only as a measure of last resort and work towards alternatives<br /> (14) Enhance consular protection, assistance and cooperation throughout the migration cycle<br /> (15) Provide access to basic services for migrants<br /> (16) Empower migrants and societies to realize full inclusion and social cohesion<br /> (17) Eliminate all forms of discrimination and promote evidence-based public discourse to shape perceptions of migration<br /> (18) Invest in skills development and facilitate mutual recognition of skills, qualifications and competences<br /> (19) Create conditions for migrants and diasporas to fully contribute to sustainable development in all countries<br /> (20) Promote faster, safer and cheaper transfer of remittances and foster financial inclusion of migrants<br /> (21) Cooperate in facilitating safe and dignified return and readmission, as well as sustainable reintegration<br /> (22) Establish mechanisms for the portability of social security entitlements and earned benefits<br /> (23) Strengthen international cooperation and global partnerships for safe, orderly and regular migration</p> <p><small>Sources: <a href="https://refugeesmigrants.un.org/migration-compact">https://refugeesmigrants.un.org/migration-compact</a> and <a href="https://news.un.org/en/story/2018/12/1028941">https://news.un.org/en/story/2018/12/1028941</a></small></p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 13 January 2019</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Sun, 13 Jan 2019 13:34:52 +0000 admin 963 at http://iefworld.org How can we keep global warming to 1.5°C? http://iefworld.org/node/962 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">How can we keep global warming to 1.5°C?</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Arthur Dahl</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">24. December 2018 - 20:59</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">How can we keep global warming to 1.5°C?</h2> <p>In a recent special report in <i>New Scientist</i>, Graham Lawton has sketched out what we must do to limit global warming to 1.5°C, the agreed threshold for a chance of avoiding irreversible and dangerous climate change. Quoting a lead author of the latest IPCC report on 1.5°C: " We have to do everything, and we have to do it immediately." This is not impossible, since we have the necessary technologies, but it will require unprecedented rates of transformation. The article lays out seven levels of increasing difficulty that must be pursued simultaneously.</p> <p>First, some background. Setting aside agricultural carbon emissions, 48% of the remainder is to produce heat for buildings and industry, of which 27% is from renewable sources. The next 32% is for transport, with only 3% from renewables. The remaining 20% is for power generation, of which 25% is from renewable sources. Our fossil fuel emissions have already warmed the planet by 1°C, so we have to reduce net emissions to zero by mid-century. If everybody adopts a low-carbon lifestyle immediately, we can avoid overshooting the limit. Otherwise we shall need to use expensive carbon capture and storage (CCS) and unproven carbon dioxide removal (CDR) technologies to bring us back down to a safe level by 2100.</p> <p>It is possible to calculate what our remaining carbon budget released to the atmosphere is to try to keep global warming to 1.5°C. Releasing 770 gigatonnes might give us a 50:50 chance of keeping to that target. If we want to raise the odds to two thirds, we should emit only 570 gigatonnes. With more pessimistic assumptions, the limit is considerably lower. Annual global carbon emissions are 40 gigatonnes. Half of that budget is already accounted for by existing and planned electricity generating plants unless we retire them early. To avoid continuing global warming, we must bring net emissions to zero. The following are all the things we must do together to succeed in that.</p> <p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Kill fossil fuels</span>. The move to renewable energy is accelerating, generating a quarter of our electricity in 2016, more than 10% of our total energy consumption, but we need almost complete decarbonization of electricity generation by 2050. Any continuing use of fossil fuels must be accompanied by carbon capture and storage (CCS).</p> <p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Travel light</span>. At present, more than 90% of our transport is powered by oil (petrol/gasoline, diesel and aviation fuel) and just 3% from renewables. A quarter of the energy-related CO2 emissions come from transport, and this is growing at 2.5% per year. Even a 30% reduction by 2030 means switching to electric vehicles (powered by renewables), improving fuel efficiency, replacing oil by biofuels including for aviation, and making personal sacrifices like using buses and trains over cars and planes, and traveling less.</p> <p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Rebuild everything</span>. Our homes, shops, offices and buildings account for 23% of energy-related emissions, mostly electricity for lighting, heating, cooling, elevators, office equipment and appliances. But one third is fossil fuels (gas) used for heating and cooking. These emissions need to be reduced by 80-90% by 2050, requiring energy-efficient lighting, insulation and double-glazed windows, and non-fossil-fuel heating and cooking systems. We need to refurbish 5% of existing buildings every year, and make all new buildings zero carbon by 2020, moving away from carbon-intensive concrete and steel to carbon-neutral wood-based materials or changing construction methods entirely.</p> <p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">A new industrial revolution</span>. Industry uses coal and other fossil fuels to produce heat and steam to produce metals, pulp and paper, chemicals, concrete and minerals, and this needs to be reduced by 80%. Phasing out coal, increasing energy efficiency and electrifying would only be a beginning. We need massive R&amp;D to find new, carbon-free industrial process for cement, iron and steel, plus carbon capture and storage for uses we cannot replace in time. Some new technologies exist, but they must become more affordable and scaled up.</p> <p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Reap what we sow</span>. Land use produces one quarter of carbon emissions, raising issues of forests, farms and food. Growing food inevitably emits CO2, and pasture with cows on it is a gigantic source of CO2 and methane. Land can be a carbon sink, and forests pull CO2 out of the air. We need to intensify agriculture while consuming less of foods with high greenhouse gas emissions, especially from cattle, swapping pasture for forests and finding room to produce biofuels for aviation. We also have to reduce deforestation.</p> <p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Suck, not blow</span>. Reaching net emissions does not mean no emissions, since some cannot be eliminated, like nitrous oxide from agricultural fertilizers. Any remaining emissions need to be balanced by removing carbon dioxide already in the atmosphere. All pathways to 1.5C require carbon dioxide removal (CDR), for which we have no proven technologies. Planting forests is the simplest way. There are proposals for bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) where you grow biofuels, burn them, and sequester the CO2. This has not been done at scale and is a major risk in reaching the target.</p> <p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Change ourselves</span>. Addressing our demand for energy is the biggest challenge. When we use an electrical appliance, spend time inside a building, use hot water, travel anywhere in a vehicle, or buy or eat anything, we are contributing to the problem. We need to start today to make sacrifices: drive less, fly less, consume less meat, have fewer children. A plant-based diet reduces a food carbon footprint by 90%. Avoid beef with a carbon footprint three times pork and six times chicken. Tropical fruits imported by air, and cheese are other offenders. Reduce short car journeys; car-pool, bike or walk instead. But one vacation flight would wipe out the benefits of going vegetarian for a year or driving 2500 km less. In your home, replace appliances with energy-efficient models, lower the temperature of hot water, use a low-flow showerhead, do not leave appliances on standby, and dry washing outside. Smart thermostats can reduce household emissions by up to 26%. Moving to a smaller home can cut emissions by 27%. At the office, turning off lights and your workstation when leaving, and unplugging your phone charger, can cut emissions by up to 28%. Working from home in the US can mean driving 77% less.</p> <p>Above all, there is a lack of political will for the biggest transformation ever. People have to demand these changes with mass movements. This may seem impossible, but we have to try. We need to convince everyone that green alternatives improve our quality of life as well as the environment.</p> <hr /> <p><small>Source: Summarized from Lawton, Graham. 2018. <b>Hitting 1.5°C</b>. Special Report. <i>New Scientist</i> Vol. 240, Issue 3207, pp. 31-37. 8 December 2018.</small></p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 24 December 2018</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-blog-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Blog tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/267" hreflang="en">Climate change</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 24 Dec 2018 18:59:38 +0000 Arthur Dahl 962 at http://iefworld.org Talanoa Call for Action on Climate Change http://iefworld.org/Talanoa3 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Talanoa Call for Action on Climate Change</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">12. December 2018 - 21:29</span> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/9" hreflang="en">Climate change</a></div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Talanoa Call for Action on Climate Change</h2> <p>The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) launched the Talanoa Dialogue a year ago to share positive stories and to build commitment to more action on climate change. The International Environment Forum submitted a <a href="/Talanoa1">written contribution</a> to the Talanoa Dialogue, and two IEF members took part in face-to-face dialogues with diplomats at the <a href="/Talanoa2">Talanoa Dialogues in Bonn</a>, Germany, in May 2018. Sylvia Karlsson-Vinkhuyzen again participated in the Ministerial Talanoa Dialogue at COP24 in Katowice, Poland, on 11 December 2018. See her blog at <a href="http://sylviakarlssonvinkhuyzen.blogspot.com/">http://sylviakarlssonvinkhuyzen.blogspot.com/</a>.</p> <p>The Talanoa Dialogue closed on 12 December with the Talanoa Call for Action (see below and download as <a href="/fl/Talanoa_Call_for_Action2018.pdf">pdf</a>) which reflects the IEF contribution to the dialogue. We encourage all IEF members to join the Talanoa Call for Action. See the press release below. See also the <a href="/IEFclimatechange">IEF position on climate change</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R71RxypiZZc&amp;feature=youtu.be">Video with Greta and Timoci, capturing the ‘Talanoa’ calls for action</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eB3hhaY5HqY&amp;feature=youtu.be">Animation video summarizing the main messages and inputs of the Talanoa</a></p> <p><a href="https://cop23.com.fj/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/TD-Call-for-Action_Linked-min.pdf">A guide to joining the Talanoa Call for Action</a></p> <p><a href="https://unfccc.int/topics/2018-talanoa-dialogue-platform">2018 Talanoa Dialogue Platform</a></p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <p>UN Climate Change News, 12 December 2018 – Today, at the closing of the Talanoa Dialogue, the Presidencies of this and last years’ UN Climate Change Conferences (COP24 and COP23) issued the Talanoa Call for Action. This statement calls for the urgent and rapid mobilization of all societal actors to step up their efforts with a view to meeting the global climate goals agreed in Paris in 2015. The calls to action were delivered by youth champions Timoci Naulusala from Fiji and Hanna Wojdowska from Poland.</p> <p>The closing session concluded 21 ministerial roundtables – convened on the previous day at COP24, which runs to the end of the week here in Katowice, Poland. The roundtables brought together nearly 100 ministers and over 40 non-Party stakeholders to chart a way forward for global climate action.</p> <p>“It is with great joy and commitment that the Polish Presidency co-leads with Fiji the Talanoa Dialogue,” said COP 24 President Michał Kurtyka. “The exchange of experiences and good practices, which is guided by the idea of Dialogue, is particularly important at this stage – the Dialogue’s discussion will focus on the question: how do we want to achieve the goal? A similar question constitutes the main issue of COP24, that is, the establishment of the Katowice Rules mapping out the viable paths that each country will follow in their efforts at intensifying actions for climate protection. The Talanoa Dialogue is therefore closely interwoven with the main task of COP24 – developing specific methods of combating climate change that are optimal for each Party.”</p> <p>Afterwards, the Prime Minister of Fiji, H.E. Frank Bainimarama, President of COP23, said that the time for talking and listening – as important as that has been and will continue to be in the Talanoa process – must now also give way to action.</p> <p>“The Talanoa Dialogue now must give way to the Talanoa Call for Action. Together, we must recognize the gravity of the challenge we face – the need to increase our collective nationally determined contributions fivefold – five times more ambition, five times more action – if we are to achieve the 1.5 degree target. Together, we must unreservedly accept the science and the advice that our present NDCs have us on target for warming of at least 3 degrees by century’s end. Together, we must commit to continue exchanging ideas and best practices to raise our NDCs and achieve net-zero emissions by 2050. Together, we can overcome the greatest threat humanity has ever faced – with the entire global community eventually emerging more prosperous and more resilient,” he said.</p> <p>Overall, today’s “call for action” represents the outcome of a year-long process that has, for the first time in UN Climate Change’s history, brought together governments and thousands of actors from across the world in informal discussions on international climate policy that have seen virtually all segments of society have their say.</p> <p>The call is issued against the backdrop of stark warnings in several recent UN reports – including the IPCC’s Special Report on 1.5 and UNEP’s Emissions Gap Report – which show that greenhouse gas emissions continue to grow and only rapid and far-reaching action on an unprecedented scale, together with adequate resources and technology, can prevent the worst climate impacts, and help transition economies to a just, clean future.</p> <p>It therefore sends a critical political signal to governments as they embark on updating their national climate pledges and preparing long-term climate strategies, due by 2020.</p> <p>In the spirit of the Talanoa Dialogue – which was inclusive of the inputs of all actors throughout 2018 – the statement captures a series of “calls” directed at governments, international agencies, non-Party stakeholders, civil society, spiritual leaders and youth, as a means of fostering greater political will and action. The Presidencies now invite all stakeholders – including the general public – to join the Talanoa Call for Action to amplify the message and spread support.</p> <p>The Talanoa Dialogue – borrowing from the Fijian traditional way of holding conversations to tackle collective issues – was convened as part of the UN climate talks and gathered views on three guiding questions in relation to the climate crisis: Where we are? Where do we want to go? How do we get there?</p> <p>Its purpose was to take stock of global efforts since the Paris Agreement was adopted and inform the preparation of nationally determined contributions. The response has been overwhelming, showing unprecedented levels of climate action by governments, businesses, civil society, citizens, and many others. Under the third question, the process identified myriad solutions and ways forward to meet the Paris goals.</p> <p>It is noteworthy that in many cases the views gathered from non-Party stakeholders are those of coalitions of actors spanning many different countries and representing a sizeable share of the world population and world economy.</p> <p>Virtually all contributions show alarm at the gap between current levels of ambition and action and what is required to achieve Paris Agreement goal, and call for enhanced determination from all to create an enabling environment and remove barriers to unleash untapped potential.</p> <p><small>Source: <a href="https://unfccc.int/news/join-the-talanoa-call-for-action">https://unfccc.int/news/join-the-talanoa-call-for-action</a></small></p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Talanoa Call for Action</h2> <p>Issued by the two presidencies of COP23 and COP24 on 12 December 2018</p> </div> <p><b>In the Pacific tradition of Talanoa, the world came together this past year to share experiences and help make wise decisions to inspire a global response to the threat of a changing climate.</b> People shared stories of the widespread devastation already inflicted on our communities by climate change, and the increasing risks for human and food security. They also shared stories of ambitious action already being taken all over the world in response to these threats.</p> <p><b>Climate action is on the rise, but not at the speed and scale we need.</b> Actors in all countries, including Parties and non-Party stakeholders at the national, regional and community levels are already taking action. Pre-2020 action is vital for putting the world on a path towards achieving the long-term goals of the Paris Agreement. But it is not only governments that must act. Non-Party stakeholders can and should join in pre-2020 action and complement action by states.</p> <p><b>According to the science, global emissions continue to rise.</b> This leaves a significant gap in the effort needed to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius. The IPCC Special Report on 1.5 degrees highlights, among other things, the benefits of holding warming to below 1.5 degrees. It also concludes that to keep global warming within 1.5 degrees, global emissions need to be halved by 2030. And according to the Paris Agreement, in the second half of the century, we aim to achieve net-zero emissions, on the basis of equity, and in the context of sustainable development and efforts to eradicate poverty.</p> <p><b>The window for action is closing fast – we need to do more and we need to do it now.</b> We may have already caused warming of 1 degree Celsius and we can no longer push significant and effective action further down the road. Existing possibilities to limit global warming must now be matched with the necessary will and engagement of all levels of government and society.</p> <p><b>The key messages emerging from the Talanoa Dialogue and synthesis report can show the way forward.</b> They can inform Parties’ Nationally Determined Contributions by 2020, as well as their participation in the 2019 Secretary-General's Climate Summit, the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development and other important processes.</p> <p><b>We must fulfil the goals of the Paris Agreement.</b></p> <p>• We saw overwhelming support for the Paris Agreement and its goals. We agreed to hold temperature rise well below 2 degrees Celsius and to pursue efforts to limit it to 1.5 degrees.</p> <p><b>We must achieve a just transformation towards a better world.</b></p> <p>• We celebrate a vision – shared by many – of a better world. A world with universal access to sustainable and affordable energy sources, emissions-neutral infrastructure and buildings, zero-emission transport systems, energy efficient industries, and the elimination of waste by reducing, recycling or reusing all materials. A world of productive and efficient carbon reservoirs and sinks. A world of clean air, climate-resilient food production; healthy lands, forests and oceans; an end to ecosystem degradation; and, sustainable lifestyles worldwide.</p> <p>• In this transformation, based on nationally defined development priorities, no one should be left behind. The benefits of this journey must be spread across society and, in getting there, a just transition must be available for all.</p> <p><b>We must unlock the full potential of technology.</b></p> <p>• Many solutions already exist and more can be developed. They can take us forward and we must act now to start the transformation. Climate action brings opportunities for economic growth and gains in productivity.</p> <p><b>We must demonstrate bold leadership.</b></p> <p>• Climate action must remain at the top of the political and strategic agendas of world leaders. They must now translate the global vision of the Paris Agreement into national and local action, provide the necessary resources, and motivate and mobilize all stakeholders to help support and deliver a net-zero emission and climate-resilient future.</p> <p><b>We must act together.</b></p> <p>• Multilateralism and cooperation will enable us to address problems together, find solutions, and build consensus for the common good. Only a global coalition of actors – including Parties, national and sub-national governments, private sector companies, the investment community, civil society and all non-Party stakeholders – can take us there.</p> <p><b>We call upon Heads of State and Government to maintain climate action at the top of the political agenda.</b> Governments must continue to strengthen national policies and regulatory and institutional frameworks that deliver action and support until 2020 and beyond; provide grounds for bold, integrated and coherent policies; and, create a stable environment that stimulates investment in and action on adaptation, mitigation and building climate resilience. We recognize governments must anticipate and address any negative effects, particularly on workers.</p> <p><b>We call upon Parties to work closely with non-Party stakeholders to enhance global ambition by 2020 and to develop long-term, low-emission development strategies.</b> Together, Parties, working with non-Party stakeholders including sub-national governments, should pursue efforts to strengthen mitigation and adaptation commensurate with the objectives of the Paris Agreement. They must work together in the planning and pursuit of low emissions and climate-resilient development.</p> <p><b>We call upon government and international agencies to step up financial, technical and technological cooperation.</b> We must ensure the resources, technology and capacity for climate action are widely shared, and the barriers in the way of unlocking potential are removed. We also call upon governments and non-Party stakeholders to scale-up cooperation and resources for research and development, and transfer technologies for achieving low greenhouse gas emissions and climate-resilient development.</p> <p><b>We call upon private sector leaders to be drivers of change.</b> We call upon the business community – from large, medium and small-sized enterprises, investors and entrepreneurs – to establish technology and science-based targets and transition plans, provide leadership in their sectors and supply chains, cultivate innovation and creativity, and invest in pursuit of the goals of the Paris Agreement.</p> <p><b>We call upon civil society leaders to marshal the public and political will needed to drive action.</b> We call upon them to engage political leadership, influence and challenge norms, enhance awareness, and mobilize action at the regional, state and local levels.</p> <p><b>We call on spiritual leaders to unlock spiritual pathways for addressing climate change.</b> We call on them to help their followers reconnect with the wonders of nature and creation, nurture love for the planet and foster compassion and reconciliation.</p> <p><b>We call on the youth of the world to mobilize at a larger scale to ensure that their future is secure.</b> We call on everyone to engage with the concerns that climate change poses for youth, and to take decisive action that leads to better opportunities, security and wellbeing for young people, today and in the future. We call upon decision-makers to adjust education systems to help young people understand, address and adapt to global warming.</p> <p><b>We call upon everyone to take forward a clear signal from the Talanoa Dialogue.</b> We call upon everyone to act with urgency and recognize that we are in a race against time – we must act now to ensure sustainable development and the preservation of life on earth as we know it.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 13 December 2018</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Wed, 12 Dec 2018 19:29:58 +0000 admin 958 at http://iefworld.org Global Governance and the Emergence of Global Institutions for the 21st Century http://iefworld.org/governanceWG <span property="schema:name" class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Global Governance and the Emergence of Global Institutions for the 21st Century</span> <span rel="schema:author" class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/index.php/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2018-12-10T20:29:22+00:00" class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">10. December 2018 - 22:29</span> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/51" hreflang="en">Governance</a></div> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"> <div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);"> Global Governance and the Emergence of Global Institutions for the 21st Century</h2> <p>A working group supported by the Global Challenges Foundation </p> <!--break--> <p><img alt="Global Governance" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/NSFDiapositive1.jpg"></p> </div> <p>The original members of the group are<br> - Augusto Lopez-Claros, Senior Fellow, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, and World Bank, Bolivia/USA<br> - Arthur Lyon Dahl, President, International Environment Forum and retired senior official of UN Environment, Switzerland<br> - Maja Groff, international lawyer based in The Hague, Canada/Netherlands<br> winners of the New Shape Prize for this project in May 2018. </p> <p>Additional members are being added to the working group, including Mahmud Samandari of Geneva, Switzerland, Sylvia Karlsson-Vinkhuyzen, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Wageningen University, the Netherlands, and Joachim Monkelbaan, Sustainability Leadership Lab, Geneva, Switzerland.</p> <p>The first product of the working group will be a book now completed (400 pages) to be published later in 2019 by Cambridge University Press.</p> <p><a href="/node/949"><b>Summary Paper</b></a> on the working group proposal November 2018</p> <p>Diagram of proposed revisions to the United Nations and the UN Charter:<br> <img alt="Global Institutions table" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/NSFDiapositive2.jpg"></p> <hr> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Recent activities</h3> <p>On 5 November 2018, the Baha'i International Community in New York hosted an event "<b>Global Governance in an Age of Transition: The Current and Future Role of the United Nations</b>" featuring our proposal (see the <a href="/node/952">separate report</a>).</p> <p>The working group presented its proposals at the <a href="/node/955"><b>Paris Peace Forum</b></a> on 11-13 November 2018, to the All Party Parliamentary Group on the Baha'is, meeting in the Churchill Room of the Houses of Parliament at Westminster, U.K., on 14 November, to a meeting of Chief Justices in New Delhi, at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, D.C., on 10 December, and in some other fora.</p> <p>Working group members joined with another GCF working group on the <b>Common Home of Humanity</b> (<a href="http://www.commonhomeofhumanity.org">http://www.commonhomeofhumanity.org</a>) in Porto, Portugal, on 1-3 February 2019 for joint discussions. Representation from another working group, <b>Together First</b> (<a href="http://www.together1st.org">http://www.together1st.org</a>), also joined in the discussions.</p> <p>On 15 February 2019 in Stockholm, the working group defended <a href="/govGCF190110">selected modules based on its proposals</a> before a panel of expert outside reviewers convened by the Global Challenges Foundation.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;"> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">The Global Challenges Foundation</h3> <p>The Global Challenges Foundation (<a href="https://globalchallenges.org/en">https://globalchallenges.org/en</a>) was founded in 2012 by Swedish financial analyst and author Laszlo Szombatfalvy, with the aim to contribute to reducing the main global problems and risks that threaten humanity.</p> <p>The Foundation is particularly concerned about a number of risks that could threaten the existence of at least a tenth of the Earth’s population, referred to as global catastrophic risks. These include climate change, other large-scale environmental damage, politically motivated violence, extreme poverty and population growth. These five main challenges are interdependent and influence each other detrimentally, requiring immediate joint action by the world’s states. As these risks include the greatest threats to humanity, they should be on top of the international political agenda in order to ensure safety for existing and future generations.</p> <p><a href="https://www.globalchallenges.org/en/our-work/quarterly-reports/from-idea-to-prototype">Quarterly Report of the Global Challenges Foundation</a> November 2018, "From Idea to Prototype" includes an update on our work.</p> <p>In November 2016, the Global Challenges Foundation (GCF) launched a global prize competition, “<b>The Global Challenges Prize 2017: A New Shape</b>”, which challenged thinkers all over the world to formulate proposals for new models of how the major global risks could be managed more effectively and equitably to avoid an extreme global catastrophe in coming decades. The New Shape Prize was the biggest competition of its kind, seeking improved frameworks of global governance of global catastrophic risks. During the time it was open for submissions from November 2016 to September 2017, it received 2,702 entries from 122 countries.</p> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">The New Shape Prize</h3> <p>The New Shape Prize was awarded at the <a href="https://globalchallenges.org/en/our-work/new-shape-forum">New Shape Forum</a> in Stockholm, Sweden, 26-30 May 2018. See our <a href="/node/925">Report on the New Shape Forum</a>.</p> <p>Our proposal "<b>Global Governance and the Emergence of Global Institutions for the 21st Century</b>" by Augusto Lopez-Claros, Arthur Lyon Dahl and Maja P.C.E. Groff, was the first of three winners of the New Shape Prize awarded on 30 May 2018.</p> <p><img alt="Maja Groff" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/NSF_Groff180527_26.jpg"> <small>Maja Groff presenting at the New Shape Forum</small></p> <p>The summary of our proposal as a finalist is at <b><a href="https://globalchallenges.org/en/our-work/the-new-shape-prize/finalists/global-governance-and-the-emergence-of-global-institutions-for-the-21st-century">Global Governance and the Emergence of Global Institutions for the 21st Century</a></b>,<br> and you can see the <a href="/node/939"><b>Full Proposal</b></a> as submitted to the GCF.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;"> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><small>Last updated 16 February 2019</small></p> </div> </div> Mon, 10 Dec 2018 20:29:22 +0000 admin 950 at http://iefworld.org