International Environment Forum - A Bahá'í inspired organization for environment and sustainability http://iefworld.org/rss.xml en Talanoa Call for Action on Climate Change http://iefworld.org/Talanoa3 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Talanoa Call for Action on Climate Change</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">12. December 2018 - 21:29</span> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/9" hreflang="en">Climate change</a></div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Talanoa Call for Action on Climate Change</h2> <p>The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) launched the Talanoa Dialogue a year ago to share positive stories and to build commitment to more action on climate change. The International Environment Forum submitted a <a href="/Talanoa1">written contribution</a> to the Talanoa Dialogue, and two IEF members took part in face-to-face dialogues with diplomats at the <a href="/Talanoa2">Talanoa Dialogues in Bonn</a>, Germany, in May 2018. Sylvia Karlsson-Vinkhuyzen again participated in the Ministerial Talanoa Dialogue at COP24 in Katowice, Poland, on 11 December 2018. See her blog at <a href="http://sylviakarlssonvinkhuyzen.blogspot.com/">http://sylviakarlssonvinkhuyzen.blogspot.com/</a>.</p> <p>The Talanoa Dialogue closed on 12 December with the Talanoa Call for Action (see below and download as <a href="/fl/Talanoa_Call_for_Action2018.pdf">pdf</a>) which reflects the IEF contribution to the dialogue. We encourage all IEF members to join the Talanoa Call for Action. See the press release below. See also the <a href="/IEFclimatechange">IEF position on climate change</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R71RxypiZZc&amp;feature=youtu.be">Video with Greta and Timoci, capturing the ‘Talanoa’ calls for action</a></p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eB3hhaY5HqY&amp;feature=youtu.be">Animation video summarizing the main messages and inputs of the Talanoa</a></p> <p><a href="https://cop23.com.fj/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/TD-Call-for-Action_Linked-min.pdf">A guide to joining the Talanoa Call for Action</a></p> <p><a href="https://unfccc.int/topics/2018-talanoa-dialogue-platform">2018 Talanoa Dialogue Platform</a></p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <p>UN Climate Change News, 12 December 2018 – Today, at the closing of the Talanoa Dialogue, the Presidencies of this and last years’ UN Climate Change Conferences (COP24 and COP23) issued the Talanoa Call for Action. This statement calls for the urgent and rapid mobilization of all societal actors to step up their efforts with a view to meeting the global climate goals agreed in Paris in 2015. The calls to action were delivered by youth champions Timoci Naulusala from Fiji and Hanna Wojdowska from Poland.</p> <p>The closing session concluded 21 ministerial roundtables – convened on the previous day at COP24, which runs to the end of the week here in Katowice, Poland. The roundtables brought together nearly 100 ministers and over 40 non-Party stakeholders to chart a way forward for global climate action.</p> <p>“It is with great joy and commitment that the Polish Presidency co-leads with Fiji the Talanoa Dialogue,” said COP 24 President Michał Kurtyka. “The exchange of experiences and good practices, which is guided by the idea of Dialogue, is particularly important at this stage – the Dialogue’s discussion will focus on the question: how do we want to achieve the goal? A similar question constitutes the main issue of COP24, that is, the establishment of the Katowice Rules mapping out the viable paths that each country will follow in their efforts at intensifying actions for climate protection. The Talanoa Dialogue is therefore closely interwoven with the main task of COP24 – developing specific methods of combating climate change that are optimal for each Party.”</p> <p>Afterwards, the Prime Minister of Fiji, H.E. Frank Bainimarama, President of COP23, said that the time for talking and listening – as important as that has been and will continue to be in the Talanoa process – must now also give way to action.</p> <p>“The Talanoa Dialogue now must give way to the Talanoa Call for Action. Together, we must recognize the gravity of the challenge we face – the need to increase our collective nationally determined contributions fivefold – five times more ambition, five times more action – if we are to achieve the 1.5 degree target. Together, we must unreservedly accept the science and the advice that our present NDCs have us on target for warming of at least 3 degrees by century’s end. Together, we must commit to continue exchanging ideas and best practices to raise our NDCs and achieve net-zero emissions by 2050. Together, we can overcome the greatest threat humanity has ever faced – with the entire global community eventually emerging more prosperous and more resilient,” he said.</p> <p>Overall, today’s “call for action” represents the outcome of a year-long process that has, for the first time in UN Climate Change’s history, brought together governments and thousands of actors from across the world in informal discussions on international climate policy that have seen virtually all segments of society have their say.</p> <p>The call is issued against the backdrop of stark warnings in several recent UN reports – including the IPCC’s Special Report on 1.5 and UNEP’s Emissions Gap Report – which show that greenhouse gas emissions continue to grow and only rapid and far-reaching action on an unprecedented scale, together with adequate resources and technology, can prevent the worst climate impacts, and help transition economies to a just, clean future.</p> <p>It therefore sends a critical political signal to governments as they embark on updating their national climate pledges and preparing long-term climate strategies, due by 2020.</p> <p>In the spirit of the Talanoa Dialogue – which was inclusive of the inputs of all actors throughout 2018 – the statement captures a series of “calls” directed at governments, international agencies, non-Party stakeholders, civil society, spiritual leaders and youth, as a means of fostering greater political will and action. The Presidencies now invite all stakeholders – including the general public – to join the Talanoa Call for Action to amplify the message and spread support.</p> <p>The Talanoa Dialogue – borrowing from the Fijian traditional way of holding conversations to tackle collective issues – was convened as part of the UN climate talks and gathered views on three guiding questions in relation to the climate crisis: Where we are? Where do we want to go? How do we get there?</p> <p>Its purpose was to take stock of global efforts since the Paris Agreement was adopted and inform the preparation of nationally determined contributions. The response has been overwhelming, showing unprecedented levels of climate action by governments, businesses, civil society, citizens, and many others. Under the third question, the process identified myriad solutions and ways forward to meet the Paris goals.</p> <p>It is noteworthy that in many cases the views gathered from non-Party stakeholders are those of coalitions of actors spanning many different countries and representing a sizeable share of the world population and world economy.</p> <p>Virtually all contributions show alarm at the gap between current levels of ambition and action and what is required to achieve Paris Agreement goal, and call for enhanced determination from all to create an enabling environment and remove barriers to unleash untapped potential.</p> <p><small>Source: <a href="https://unfccc.int/news/join-the-talanoa-call-for-action">https://unfccc.int/news/join-the-talanoa-call-for-action</a></small></p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Talanoa Call for Action</h2> <p>Issued by the two presidencies of COP23 and COP24 on 12 December 2018</p> </div> <p><b>In the Pacific tradition of Talanoa, the world came together this past year to share experiences and help make wise decisions to inspire a global response to the threat of a changing climate.</b> People shared stories of the widespread devastation already inflicted on our communities by climate change, and the increasing risks for human and food security. They also shared stories of ambitious action already being taken all over the world in response to these threats.</p> <p><b>Climate action is on the rise, but not at the speed and scale we need.</b> Actors in all countries, including Parties and non-Party stakeholders at the national, regional and community levels are already taking action. Pre-2020 action is vital for putting the world on a path towards achieving the long-term goals of the Paris Agreement. But it is not only governments that must act. Non-Party stakeholders can and should join in pre-2020 action and complement action by states.</p> <p><b>According to the science, global emissions continue to rise.</b> This leaves a significant gap in the effort needed to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius. The IPCC Special Report on 1.5 degrees highlights, among other things, the benefits of holding warming to below 1.5 degrees. It also concludes that to keep global warming within 1.5 degrees, global emissions need to be halved by 2030. And according to the Paris Agreement, in the second half of the century, we aim to achieve net-zero emissions, on the basis of equity, and in the context of sustainable development and efforts to eradicate poverty.</p> <p><b>The window for action is closing fast – we need to do more and we need to do it now.</b> We may have already caused warming of 1 degree Celsius and we can no longer push significant and effective action further down the road. Existing possibilities to limit global warming must now be matched with the necessary will and engagement of all levels of government and society.</p> <p><b>The key messages emerging from the Talanoa Dialogue and synthesis report can show the way forward.</b> They can inform Parties’ Nationally Determined Contributions by 2020, as well as their participation in the 2019 Secretary-General's Climate Summit, the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development and other important processes.</p> <p><b>We must fulfil the goals of the Paris Agreement.</b></p> <p>• We saw overwhelming support for the Paris Agreement and its goals. We agreed to hold temperature rise well below 2 degrees Celsius and to pursue efforts to limit it to 1.5 degrees.</p> <p><b>We must achieve a just transformation towards a better world.</b></p> <p>• We celebrate a vision – shared by many – of a better world. A world with universal access to sustainable and affordable energy sources, emissions-neutral infrastructure and buildings, zero-emission transport systems, energy efficient industries, and the elimination of waste by reducing, recycling or reusing all materials. A world of productive and efficient carbon reservoirs and sinks. A world of clean air, climate-resilient food production; healthy lands, forests and oceans; an end to ecosystem degradation; and, sustainable lifestyles worldwide.</p> <p>• In this transformation, based on nationally defined development priorities, no one should be left behind. The benefits of this journey must be spread across society and, in getting there, a just transition must be available for all.</p> <p><b>We must unlock the full potential of technology.</b></p> <p>• Many solutions already exist and more can be developed. They can take us forward and we must act now to start the transformation. Climate action brings opportunities for economic growth and gains in productivity.</p> <p><b>We must demonstrate bold leadership.</b></p> <p>• Climate action must remain at the top of the political and strategic agendas of world leaders. They must now translate the global vision of the Paris Agreement into national and local action, provide the necessary resources, and motivate and mobilize all stakeholders to help support and deliver a net-zero emission and climate-resilient future.</p> <p><b>We must act together.</b></p> <p>• Multilateralism and cooperation will enable us to address problems together, find solutions, and build consensus for the common good. Only a global coalition of actors – including Parties, national and sub-national governments, private sector companies, the investment community, civil society and all non-Party stakeholders – can take us there.</p> <p><b>We call upon Heads of State and Government to maintain climate action at the top of the political agenda.</b> Governments must continue to strengthen national policies and regulatory and institutional frameworks that deliver action and support until 2020 and beyond; provide grounds for bold, integrated and coherent policies; and, create a stable environment that stimulates investment in and action on adaptation, mitigation and building climate resilience. We recognize governments must anticipate and address any negative effects, particularly on workers.</p> <p><b>We call upon Parties to work closely with non-Party stakeholders to enhance global ambition by 2020 and to develop long-term, low-emission development strategies.</b> Together, Parties, working with non-Party stakeholders including sub-national governments, should pursue efforts to strengthen mitigation and adaptation commensurate with the objectives of the Paris Agreement. They must work together in the planning and pursuit of low emissions and climate-resilient development.</p> <p><b>We call upon government and international agencies to step up financial, technical and technological cooperation.</b> We must ensure the resources, technology and capacity for climate action are widely shared, and the barriers in the way of unlocking potential are removed. We also call upon governments and non-Party stakeholders to scale-up cooperation and resources for research and development, and transfer technologies for achieving low greenhouse gas emissions and climate-resilient development.</p> <p><b>We call upon private sector leaders to be drivers of change.</b> We call upon the business community – from large, medium and small-sized enterprises, investors and entrepreneurs – to establish technology and science-based targets and transition plans, provide leadership in their sectors and supply chains, cultivate innovation and creativity, and invest in pursuit of the goals of the Paris Agreement.</p> <p><b>We call upon civil society leaders to marshal the public and political will needed to drive action.</b> We call upon them to engage political leadership, influence and challenge norms, enhance awareness, and mobilize action at the regional, state and local levels.</p> <p><b>We call on spiritual leaders to unlock spiritual pathways for addressing climate change.</b> We call on them to help their followers reconnect with the wonders of nature and creation, nurture love for the planet and foster compassion and reconciliation.</p> <p><b>We call on the youth of the world to mobilize at a larger scale to ensure that their future is secure.</b> We call on everyone to engage with the concerns that climate change poses for youth, and to take decisive action that leads to better opportunities, security and wellbeing for young people, today and in the future. We call upon decision-makers to adjust education systems to help young people understand, address and adapt to global warming.</p> <p><b>We call upon everyone to take forward a clear signal from the Talanoa Dialogue.</b> We call upon everyone to act with urgency and recognize that we are in a race against time – we must act now to ensure sustainable development and the preservation of life on earth as we know it.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 13 December 2018</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Wed, 12 Dec 2018 19:29:58 +0000 admin 958 at http://iefworld.org Leaves - November IEF newsletter is available http://iefworld.org/node/255 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Leaves - November IEF newsletter is available</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">17. November 2018 - 22:40</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Read on line: <a href="/newslt113"><strong><em>Leaves</em></strong> 20(11) November 2018</a> light text version with fewer illustrations.<br /> Download as a <a href="/fl/IEF_Leaves181115.pdf">pdf version</a> [0.5 mb].</p> <table background="/gr/BLEAF1.JPG" style="background-color: rgb(0, 153, 0); width: 100%; height: 55px; text-align: left; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Sat, 17 Nov 2018 20:40:52 +0000 admin 255 at http://iefworld.org http://iefworld.org/node/255#comments Paris Peace Forum and Global Governance http://iefworld.org/node/955 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Paris Peace Forum and Global Governance</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">16. November 2018 - 0:21</span> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/51" hreflang="en">Governance</a></div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Paris Peace Forum and Global Governance</h2> </div> <p>Since winning the <a href="/node/925">New Shape Prize</a> for the proposal “<b>Global Governance and the Emergence of Global Institutions for the 21st Century</b>”, the effort now is to make these proposals for UN reform known to a wider audience. IEF is hosting a <a href="/governanceWG">web page for the governance project</a> while its own web site is still under development, including a report on the awarding of the prize and a recent <a href="/node/949">paper</a> describing the evolution of the proposal.</p> <p>The team of Augusto Lopez-Claros and IEF members Maja Groff and Arthur Dahl has expanded with the support of the Global Challenges Foundation to include IEF members Sylvia Karlsson-Vinkhuyzen and Joachim Monkelbaan, as well as some distinguished experts including a leading anti-corruption judge from Guatemala, and a former Chief Justice and President of Bolivia. The working group met in Paris on 9-10 November to work on their book to be published next year by Cambridge University Press.</p> <p><img alt=" " data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/ParisPF181113_5.jpg" style="width: 333px; height: 250px;" /><br /> <small>Paris Peace Forum</small></p> <p>They were then invited to present their proposal, along with other winners of the New Shape Prize, at the <a href="https://parispeaceforum.org/">Paris Peace Forum</a> convened by French President Macron on 11-13 November. The Forum was opened by a gathering of world leaders including the UN Secretary General and many Heads of State. This was followed by two days of debate on solutions working for peace in the world and supporting multilateralism among the leaders of 120 selected projects from around the world. There were stands in the Space for Solutions, pitches to present the many projects invited to participate, and forums for discussion of the themes considered, with many opportunities for networking and collaboration. A declaration on trust and security in cyberspace was signed by many governments and internet companies. Launchings included a Pact for the Environment and a report on Information without Borders. A hackathon assembled 80 participants to develop 15 solutions to international problems. The Paris Peace Forum will become an annual event in November each year, possibly with regional Peace Forums in between.</p> <p><img alt=" " data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/ParisPF181112_5.jpg" style="width: 333px; height: 250px;" /><br /> <small>Stands with projects at Paris Peace Forum</small></p> <p><img alt=" " data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/ParisPF181112_15.jpg" style="width: 333px; height: 250px;" /><br /> <small>Pitches to present projects at Paris Peace Forum</small></p> <p>Joachim Monkelbaan has also led a team with a programme for a <b>Sustainability Leadership Lab</b> that has reached the semi-finals in the Educator’s Challenge of the Global Challenges Foundation, which was also featured at the Paris Peace Forum.</p> <p>In addition to the Paris Peace Forum itself, the IEF members presented their project to an enthusiastic group of a hundred students at Sciences Po, the prestigious French university of political sciences, organized by their United Nations Association, and at two events at the French National Baha’i Centre.</p> <p><img alt=" " data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/SciencesPo181112_12.jpg" style="width: 333px; height: 196px;" /><br /> <small>Lecture on governance at Sciences Po</small></p> <p>Arthur Dahl continued on to London to participate in a luncheon on 14 November at the British Parliament in commemoration of interfaith week and the twin anniversaries of the birth of the founders of the Baha’i Faith. The luncheon, organised by the All Party Parliamentary Group on the Baha’i Faith, was held in the Churchill Room of the Houses of Parliament, with Members of Parliament, religious leaders and other dignitaries in attendance. Arthur was the featured speaker on <a href="/ddahl18o">Integration in a World Community</a>, describing the need for more effective global governance and outlining the proposals for UN reform. This was followed by an evening meeting for youth at the United Kingdom National Baha’i Centre.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 15 November 2018</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Thu, 15 Nov 2018 22:21:13 +0000 admin 955 at http://iefworld.org ECPD International Conference http://iefworld.org/node/954 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">ECPD International Conference</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">15. November 2018 - 22:41</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">A New Concept of Human Security</h2> <p>XIV International Conference of the<br /> European Center for Peace and Development<br /> Belgrade, Serbia, 26 October 2018</p> </div> <p>The International Environment Forum continued its longstanding collaboration with the <a href="http://www.ecpd.org.rs">European Center for Peace and Development</a> (ECPD) University for Peace established by the United Nations, at its 14th international conference "<a href="http://www.ecpd.org.rs/index.php/meetings/conferences/218-ecpd-international-conference-a-new-human-concept-of-security-belgrade-city-hall-26-27-october-2018"><b>A New Concept of Human Security</b></a>" at the Belgrade City Hall, Serbia, on 26 October 2018. At the request of the president of the ECPD Council, H.E. Prof. Dr. Federico Mayor, former Director-General of UNESCO, IEF President Arthur Dahl was asked to prepare the <a href="/fl/ECPD_ConceptNote2018">Concept Note</a> for the conference and to serve as rapporteur for the conference, preparing the final <a href="http://www.ecpd.org.rs/pdf/2018/CONFERENCE/ECPD_Conference_2018_-_Report.pdf">report</a> based on the forty papers presented. He also presented a paper on <a href="/ddahl18m"> <b>Integration through shared values</b></a> and shared recollections of <a href="/node/848">Maurice Strong</a>, Secretary-General of both the 1972 United Nations Conference on the Human Environment in Stockholm and the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (Earth Summit) in Rio de Janeiro, and first Executive Director of UNEP, at a book launching commemorating his life.</p> <p>On 27-28 October, Arthur chaired the 6th Global ECPD Youth Forum on <b>Youth Power for the Common Future</b> where 26 additional papers were presented, including his own paper on "Navigating the Future with a Moral Compass". The forum included a number of workshops teaching career skills useful to nearly a hundred youth from many countries. Arthur led a discussion of the conclusions of the Youth Forum, and presented ECPD certificates to all the participants.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 15 November 2018</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Thu, 15 Nov 2018 20:41:03 +0000 admin 954 at http://iefworld.org http://iefworld.org/node/954#comments Global Governance and the Emergence of Global Institutions for the 21st Century http://iefworld.org/governanceWG <span property="schema:name" class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Global Governance and the Emergence of Global Institutions for the 21st Century</span> <span rel="schema:author" class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2018-11-07T20:29:22+00:00" class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">7. November 2018 - 22:29</span> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/51" hreflang="en">Governance</a></div> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Global Governance and the Emergence of Global Institutions for the 21st Century</h2> <p>A working group supported by the Global Challenges Foundation</p> <p><img alt="Global Governance" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/NSFDiapositive1.jpg" /></p> </div> <p>The original members of the group are<br /> - Augusto Lopez-Claros, Senior Fellow, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, and World Bank, Bolivia/USA<br /> - Arthur Lyon Dahl, President, International Environment Forum and retired senior official of UN Environment, Switzerland<br /> - Maja Groff, international lawyer based in The Hague, Canada/Netherlands<br /> winners of the New Shape Prize for this project in May 2018.</p> <p>Additional members are being added to the working group.</p> <p>The first product of the working group will be a book to be published next year by Cambridge University Press.</p> <p><a href="/node/949"><b>Summary Paper</b></a> on the working group proposal November 2018</p> <p>Diagram of proposed revisions to the United Nations and the UN Charter:<br /> <img alt="Global Institutions table" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/NSFDiapositive2.jpg" /></p> <p>On 5 November 2018, the Baha'i International Community in New York hosted an event "<b>Global Governance in an Age of Transition: The Current and Future Role of the United Nations</b>" featuring our proposal (see the <a href="/node/952">separate report</a>).</p> <p>The working group presented its proposals at the <a href="/node/955"><b>Paris Peace Forum</b></a> on 11-13 November 2018.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">The Global Challenges Foundation</h3> <p>The Global Challenges Foundation (<a href="https://globalchallenges.org/en">https://globalchallenges.org/en</a>) was founded in 2012 by Swedish financial analyst and author Laszlo Szombatfalvy, with the aim to contribute to reducing the main global problems and risks that threaten humanity.</p> <p>The Foundation is particularly concerned about a number of risks that could threaten the existence of at least a tenth of the Earth’s population, referred to as global catastrophic risks. These include climate change, other large-scale environmental damage, politically motivated violence, extreme poverty and population growth. These five main challenges are interdependent and influence each other detrimentally, requiring immediate joint action by the world’s states. As these risks include the greatest threats to humanity, they should be on top of the international political agenda in order to ensure safety for existing and future generations.</p> <p><a href="https://www.globalchallenges.org/en/our-work/quarterly-reports/from-idea-to-prototype">Quarterly Report of the Global Challenges Foundation</a> November 2018, "From Idea to Prototype" includes an update on our work.</p> <p>In November 2016, the Global Challenges Foundation (GCF) launched a global prize competition, “<b>The Global Challenges Prize 2017: A New Shape</b>”, which challenged thinkers all over the world to formulate proposals for new models of how the major global risks could be managed more effectively and equitably to avoid an extreme global catastrophe in coming decades. The New Shape Prize was the biggest competition of its kind, seeking improved frameworks of global governance of global catastrophic risks. During the time it was open for submissions from November 2016 to September 2017, it received 2,702 entries from 122 countries.</p> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">The New Shape Prize</h3> <p>The New Shape Prize was awarded at the <a href="https://globalchallenges.org/en/our-work/new-shape-forum">New Shape Forum</a> in Stockholm, Sweden, 26-30 May 2018. See our <a href="/node/925">Report on the New Shape Forum</a>.</p> <p>Our proposal "<b>Global Governance and the Emergence of Global Institutions for the 21st Century</b>" by Augusto Lopez-Claros, Arthur Lyon Dahl and Maja P.C.E. Groff, was the first of three winners of the New Shape Prize awarded on 30 May 2018.</p> <p><img alt="Maja Groff" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/NSF_Groff180527_26.jpg" /> <small>Maja Groff presenting at the New Shape Forum</small></p> <p>The summary of our proposal as a finalist is at <b><a href="https://globalchallenges.org/en/our-work/the-new-shape-prize/finalists/global-governance-and-the-emergence-of-global-institutions-for-the-21st-century">Global Governance and the Emergence of Global Institutions for the 21st Century</a></b>,<br /> and you can see the <a href="/node/939"><b>Full Proposal</b></a> as submitted to the GCF.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><small>Last updated 7 November 2018</small></p> </div> </div> Wed, 07 Nov 2018 20:29:22 +0000 admin 950 at http://iefworld.org New York Event on Global Governance http://iefworld.org/node/952 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">New York Event on Global Governance</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">7. November 2018 - 18:20</span> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/51" hreflang="en">Governance</a></div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Global Governance in an Age of Transition: The current and future role of the United Nations</h2> <p>Baha'i International Community United Nations Office, New York<br /> 5 November 2018</p> </div> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <p><img alt=" " data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/gr/BICNewShapePrize2018.jpg" style="width: 257px; height: 333px;" /></p> <p>On 5 November 2018, the Bahá’í International Community United Nations Office in New York organized an event on “Global Governance in an Age of Transition: The current and future role of the United Nations” featuring New Shape Prize awardees Augusto Lopez Claros, Maja Groff and Arthur Dahl, the latter two both members of the International Environment Forum.</p> <p>The event was opened by H.E. Ms. Irina Schoulgin Nyoni, Ambassador and Deputy Permanent Representative of Sweden at the United Nations, and moderated by Ms. Bani Dugal, Principal Representative of the Bahá’í International Community to the UN. Augusto Lopez-Claros provided an historical perspective on global governance and UN reform, and highlighted some elements of their prize-winning proposal, including reform of the General Assembly to pass legislation binding on governments, creation of a second chamber representative of the peoples of the world and civil society, establishment of an International Security Force, and giving the UN an independent funding mechanism. Maja Groff, speaking from The Hague, described the progress made over more than a century in international treaty law, continuing up to the present with the International Criminal Court, international tribunals, and the treaty banning anti-personnel mines.</p> <p>Arthur Dahl discussed new global risks that have arisen since the UN was founded, including climate change; global pollution by plastics, pesticides and other products created by industry; resource depletion threatening the planetary capacity to produce food, provide water, and supply other natural resources; and inequality growing as wealth escapes from national control and corruption spreads. To respond, the UN needs a capacity for binding legislation and enforcement in these areas, scientific advisory processes to set planetary boundaries to be respected, and negotiating mechanisms to share equitably the efforts needed to stay within those boundaries. Technology assessment is also needed for emerging risks associated with geoengineering, artificial intelligence, and the use of the Internet for social manipulation, among others.</p> <p>In exploring practical ways forward to implement these proposals, it must be acknowledged that national sovereignty is already eroding with globalisation, and the autonomy of states today is protected best by global cooperation on these issues beyond national control. It will be important to build trust that new global institutions will act in the common interest. The example in Europe which started by ceding national sovereignty in a limited area with obvious joint benefits, coal and steel for reconstruction after the war, and once that was successful gradually expanded the scope of regional institution, could be a model to follow, perhaps starting with more binding commitments to address climate change. A number of steps forward towards reform do not require charter revision and could start immediately. If charter reform proves impossible because of the veto of permanent members, then willing governments could call a charter replacement conference, get the new organisation started with a more reliable funding mechanism, and then leave the old UN behind, integrating all that is good in the UN into the new organisation.</p> <p>The global governance proposals are now being expanded into a book. They include scenarios of possible ways forward, from governments agreeing voluntarily to these changes, through step-wise progress resulting from various crises, to action by the survivors after the third world war. A world conference to discuss UN reform could be held in 2020 for the 75th anniversary of the UN, coinciding also with the extension of commitments under the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.</p> <p>After the presentations, comments were provided by H.E. Mr. Christian Wenaweser, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative of Liechtenstein to the UN, who expressed concern that international law was under assault from those who do not believe in the UN and wish to return to absolute national sovereignty, and wondered how to address this. John Wilmoth, Director, UN Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs, speaking on behalf of Elliot Harris, UN Assistant Secretary-General for Economic Development and Chief Economist, highlighted the need for a rules-based multilateral system to correct the failure to share equitably the fruits of globalization which had let to the loss of confidence in international organizations. The Sustainable Development Goals had opened a new era in global governance in which no one should be left behind. The event closed with questions from the audience and responses from the project presenters.</p> <p>For more information on the proposals, see the page on the <a href="/governanceWG">Global Governance working group</a>.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 7 November 2018</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Wed, 07 Nov 2018 16:20:23 +0000 admin 952 at http://iefworld.org Global Warming of 1.5 °C - The IPCC Special Report http://iefworld.org/node/947 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Global Warming of 1.5 °C - The IPCC Special Report</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">8. October 2018 - 19:16</span> <div class="field field--name-subjects field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/9" hreflang="en">Climate change</a></div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Global Warming of 1.5 °C - The IPCC Special Report</h2> </div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued its special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty.</p> <p>As a consensus document of scientists and governments, it is moderate in tone, but it nevertheless shows that urgent action by everyone, from governments at all levels to businesses and every individual will be required to head off what could best be described as a looming climate catastrophe. The climate is changing faster than previously expected, with impacts already evident now with 1°C of warming. We could reach 1.5°C of warming as early as 2030 with some further impacts in heatwaves, floods, droughts and biodiversity loss that cannot be avoided. A target of 2°C is no longer considered safe, and present commitments under the Paris Agreement would take the planet to at least 3°C. The next few years will be critical to our future.</p> <p>At the same time, the report has positive things to say. If we act now with the necessary urgency, it is not yet too late. We know what to do, and have the necessary technologies. The transition will be good for the economy and create jobs. While it will be expensive, it will cost less than the damage from not doing enough.</p> <p>The report also relates its findings to the Sustainable Development Goals, and shows that responding now to climate change will also help to meet the goals, reduce poverty, and move the planet towards sustainability.</p> <p>The following is an edited version of the main headline statements from the IPCC report.</p> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Understanding Global Warming of 1.5°C</h3> <p>Human activities are estimated to have caused approximately 1.0°C of global warming above pre-industrial levels, with a likely range of 0.8°C to 1.2°C. Global warming is likely to reach 1.5°C between 2030 and 2052 if it continues to increase at the current rate.</p> <p>Warming from anthropogenic emissions from the pre-industrial period to the present will persist for centuries to millennia and will continue to cause further long-term changes in the climate system, such as sea level rise, with associated impacts, but these emissions alone are unlikely to cause global warming of 1.5°C.</p> <p>Climate-related risks for natural and human systems are higher for global warming of 1.5°C than at present, but lower than at 2°C. These risks depend on the magnitude and rate of warming, geographic location, levels of development and vulnerability, and on the choices and implementation of adaptation and mitigation options.</p> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Projected Climate Change, Potential Impacts and Associated Risks</h3> <p>Climate models project robust differences in regional climate characteristics between present-day and global warming of 1.5°C, and between 1.5°C and 2°C. These differences include increases in: mean temperature in most land and ocean regions, hot extremes in most inhabited regions, heavy precipitation in several regions, and the probability of drought and precipitation deficits in some regions.</p> <p>By 2100, global mean sea level rise is projected to be around 0.1 metre lower with global warming of 1.5°C compared to 2°C. Sea level will continue to rise well beyond 2100, and the magnitude and rate of this rise depends on future emission pathways. A slower rate of sea level rise enables greater opportunities for adaptation in the human and ecological systems of small islands, low-lying coastal areas and deltas.</p> <p>On land, impacts on biodiversity and ecosystems, including species loss and extinction, are projected to be lower at 1.5°C of global warming compared to 2°C. Limiting global warming to 1.5°C compared to 2°C is projected to lower the impacts on terrestrial, freshwater, and coastal ecosystems and to retain more of their services to humans.</p> <p>Limiting global warming to 1.5°C compared to 2ºC is projected to reduce increases in ocean temperature as well as associated increases in ocean acidity and decreases in ocean oxygen levels. Consequently, limiting global warming to 1.5°C is projected to reduce risks to marine biodiversity, fisheries, and ecosystems, and their functions and services to humans, as illustrated by recent changes to Arctic sea ice and warm water coral reef ecosystems.</p> <p>Climate-related risks to health, livelihoods, food security, water supply, human security, and economic growth are projected to increase with global warming of 1.5°C and increase further with 2°C.</p> <p>Most adaptation needs will be lower for global warming of 1.5°C compared to 2°C. There are a wide range of adaptation options that can reduce the risks of climate change. There are limits to adaptation and adaptive capacity for some human and natural systems at global warming of 1.5°C, with associated losses. The number and availability of adaptation options vary by sector.</p> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Emission Pathways and System Transitions Consistent with 1.5°C Global Warming</h3> <p>In model pathways with no or limited overshoot of 1.5°C, global net anthropogenic CO2 emissions decline by about 45% from 2010 levels by 2030, reaching net zero around 2050. For limiting global warming to below 2°C, CO2 emissions are projected to decline by about 20% by 2030 in most pathways and reach net zero around 2075. Non-CO2 emissions in pathways that limit global warming to 1.5°C show deep reductions that are similar to those in pathways limiting warming to 2°C.</p> <p>Pathways limiting global warming to 1.5°C with no or limited overshoot would require rapid and far-reaching transitions in energy, land, urban and infrastructure (including transport and buildings), and industrial systems. These systems transitions are unprecedented in terms of scale, but not necessarily in terms of speed, and imply deep emissions reductions in all sectors, a wide portfolio of mitigation options and a significant upscaling of investments in those options.</p> <p>All pathways that limit global warming to 1.5°C with limited or no overshoot project the use of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) on the order of 100–1000 GtCO2 over the 21st century. CDR would be used to compensate for residual emissions and, in most cases, achieve net negative emissions to return global warming to 1.5°C following a peak. CDR deployment of several hundreds of GtCO2 is subject to multiple feasibility and sustainability constraints. Significant near-term emissions reductions and measures to lower energy and land demand can limit CDR deployment to a few hundred GtCO2 without reliance on bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS).</p> <h3 style=" color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Strengthening the Global Response in the Context of Sustainable Development and Efforts to Eradicate Poverty</h3> <p>Estimates of the global emissions outcome of current nationally stated mitigation ambitions as submitted under the Paris Agreement would lead to global greenhouse gas emissions in 2030 of 52–58 GtCO2eq yr-1. Pathways reflecting these ambitions would not limit global warming to 1.5°C, even if supplemented by very challenging increases in the scale and ambition of emissions reductions after 2030. Avoiding overshoot and reliance on future large-scale deployment of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) can only be achieved if global CO2 emissions start to decline well before 2030.</p> <p>The avoided climate change impacts on sustainable development, eradication of poverty and reducing inequalities would be greater if global warming were limited to 1.5°C rather than 2°C, if mitigation and adaptation synergies are maximized while trade-offs are minimized.</p> <p>Adaptation options specific to national contexts, if carefully selected together with enabling conditions, will have benefits for sustainable development and poverty reduction with global warming of 1.5°C, although trade-offs are possible.</p> <p>Mitigation options consistent with 1.5°C pathways are associated with multiple synergies and trade-offs across the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). While the total number of possible synergies exceeds the number of trade-offs, their net effect will depend on the pace and magnitude of changes, the composition of the mitigation portfolio and the management of the transition.</p> <p>Limiting the risks from global warming of 1.5°C in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication implies system transitions that can be enabled by an increase of adaptation and mitigation investments, policy instruments, the acceleration of technological innovation and behaviour changes.</p> <p>Sustainable development supports, and often enables, the fundamental societal and systems transitions and transformations that help limit global warming to 1.5°C. Such changes facilitate the pursuit of climate-resilient development pathways that achieve ambitious mitigation and adaptation in conjunction with poverty eradication and efforts to reduce inequalities.</p> <p>Strengthening the capacities for climate action of national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector, indigenous peoples and local communities can support the implementation of ambitious actions implied by limiting global warming to 1.5°C. International cooperation can provide an enabling environment for this to be achieved in all countries and for all people, in the context of sustainable development. International cooperation is a critical enabler for developing countries and vulnerable regions.</p> <hr> <p>IPCC. 2018. <i>Global Warming of 1.5°C</i> (SR15), Special Report. Summary for Policy Makers. Geneva: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, October 2018. <a href="https://www.ipcc.ch/report/sr15/">https://www.ipcc.ch/report/sr15/</a></p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 10 October 2018</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Mon, 08 Oct 2018 16:16:36 +0000 admin 947 at http://iefworld.org Man of the Trees http://iefworld.org/node/946 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Man of the Trees</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Arthur Dahl</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">6. October 2018 - 20:54</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Man of the Trees</h2> <p>Hanley, Paul. 2018. <i>Man of the Trees: Richard St. Barbe Baker, the first global conservationist</i><br /> Regina, Saskatchewan: University of Regina Press, 300 p.<br /> book review by Arthur Dahl</p> </div> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <p>There are unsung heroes or ancestors of the environment and sustainability movement that need to be rediscovered and honoured for their foresight. One is Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) (see book review by <a href="https://iefworld.org/node/849">Dahl 2016</a>). Another is <b>Richard St. Barbe Baker (1889-1982)</b>. Now IEF member Paul Hanley has written the definitive biography of St. Barbe, as he preferred to be known, published in Canada in October 2018.</p> <p>Paul met St. Barbe and some of his close friends, and had access to his archives, and has pulled together all these sources to trace the amazing life and significance of St. Barbe, forester, indefatigable speaker and author, world traveller and Bahá’í. It is an unforgettable read. The book includes a foreword by HRH the Prince of Wales and an introduction by Jane Goodall.</p> <p>Hanley provides detailed documentation to show how St. Barbe deserves to be called the first global conservationist. “Since his time in Africa in the early 1920s he had recognized the great danger of environmental destruction, that humankind was destroying the earth, thus threatening its future. He saw and described the future of Africa blighted by desertification and drought; envisioned the need for sustainable development far in advance of the spirit of the 1987 Brundtland Report; foresaw the Third World fuel wood crisis; grasped the global character of environment and development and the need for concerted action at the international level; understood the effect of forests on climate, thought at the time to be nonsense; foregrounded the issue of conserving biodiversity; and promoted the intrinsic value of trees and forests above and beyond any economic consideration” (p. 153).</p> <p>Baker was born in England, educated on the Canadian frontier and at Cambridge, wounded in World War I, and joined the Colonial Service as a forester in Kenya, where he co-founded Men of the Trees (now the International Tree Foundation) in 1922 to incite the Kikuyu to reforest their land. He came to appreciate the wisdom of indigenous peoples in protecting the land and forest, and was expelled from the Colonial Service for interposing himself and taking a blow intended for an African.</p> <p>He went on to develop techniques for sustainable forest yield in Nigeria; initiated the reforestation of Palestine, where the Guardian of the Baha’i Faith, Shoghi Effendi, became the first life member of Men of the Trees in 1929; worked for many years to conserve the redwoods of California; supported reforestation and desertification control in Australia and New Zealand; aided the Chipko “tree hugger” movement in the Himalayas; and organized a series of World Forestry Charter Gatherings in London to build diplomatic support for forest conservation. Reversing the desertification in the Sahara desert became his preoccupation, leading a expedition across the desert, and later all around its circumference, and proposing a Green Front to hold it back, which many years later is now being realised. He was infinitely practical, always planting trees and carrying seeds in his pockets, while appreciating the importance of the spiritual. He gave thousands of talks to conferences and school children, met heads of state and the Pope, received an OBE from Queen Elizabeth, and never stopped working for trees until his passing at the age of 92.</p> <p>As Hanley has put it so well: “Baker had an inherent sense of world citizenship, feeling equally at home in Africa, the Middle East, the Americas, the Antipodes, Asia, and Europe, through all of which he had travelled and many parts of which he knew intimately. To this universalism was added his powerful sense of the oneness of life, a natural understanding of the interrelationships and interdependence of a global ecosphere. He knew instinctively that peace and unity were linked to a right relationship to the earth, to the land and its forests. Fed by his biblical background, his adopted Bahá’í faith, and his training in forest ecology, a vision took shape, a prophetic vision of a great, global enterprise to restore the damaged earth as a vehicle for the unification of humankind. The biblical vision of the end times, of peace and harmony in an agrarian society, of the desert blooming, of spears beat into pruning hooks, loomed large in his mind.” (p. 152)</p> <p>Everyone interested in conservation, environment, sustainability and forestry, or just lovers of trees, needs to read this book and be inspired by what one person can accomplish for the planet in a lifetime.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 6 October 2018</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-blog-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Sat, 06 Oct 2018 17:54:03 +0000 Arthur Dahl 946 at http://iefworld.org IEF Governing Board election http://iefworld.org/node/940 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">IEF Governing Board election</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">admin</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">25. September 2018 - 11:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>In the recent election of the International Environment Forum Governing Board for 2018-2019, the following members were chosen: Arthur Dahl (Switzerland), Sylvia Karlsson-Vinkhuyzen (Netherlands), Laurent Mesbah (Bosnia &amp; Herzegovina), Wendi Momen (United Kingdom), Christine Muller (USA), Victoria Thoresen (Norway), and Halldor Thorgeirsson (Iceland). A total of 49 members voted during the election. The board welcomes Halldor as its newest member. Halldor has recently retired from a senior position in the Secretariat of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.</p></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Tue, 25 Sep 2018 08:15:18 +0000 admin 940 at http://iefworld.org http://iefworld.org/node/940#comments Capitalism, Short-termism, Population and the Destruction of the Planet http://iefworld.org/node/944 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Capitalism, Short-termism, Population and the Destruction of the Planet</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/3" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Arthur Dahl</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">14. September 2018 - 0:28</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div style="text-align: center;"> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2 style="text-align: center; color: rgb(0, 153, 0);">Come On! Capitalism, Short-termism, Population<br /> and the Destruction of the Planet<br /> A Report to the Club of Rome</h2> <p>by Ernst Ulrich von Weizsäcker and Anders Wijkman, Co-Presidents, Club of Rome<br /> New York: Springer. 220 p.</p> <p>Book review by Arthur Dahl</p> </div> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <p>For the 50th anniversary of the Club of Rome, whose first report "<i>The Limits to Growth</i>" in 1972 warned of global collapse in the 21st century if we continued business as usual, its current presidents have written a new book repeating that warning, but also looking optimistically at the future. They have drawn on many other distinguished contributors to reflect the best content of progressive thinking.</p> <p>The first chapter describes the many ways that current trends are unsustainable, most of which will be familiar to IEF members. In particular it notes that present conceptions of the world and institutions to manage it evolved when the world was largely empty, while in the last few decades we have rapidly reached what is now a full world, as we overshot planetary boundaries and entered the Anthropocene. Climate change is already an existential threat and accelerating. The chance that nuclear weapons might actually be used has recently increased. The population is still growing rapidly among the poor in some regions while others have ageing populations that are not replacing themselves. More people are crowding into cities, but the agriculture that feeds them is unsustainable. The digital revolution contains both opportunities and threats. Governments have set optimistic goals in the 2030 Agenda, but implementation is far from certain, and there are counter-forces of disintegration. It is a picture of a world in disarray.</p> <p>Chapter 2 is more philosophical, starting with the challenging message from the Pope in Laudato Sí, and then exploring the errors of the market doctrine and reductionist philosophy. It calls for a New Enlightenment based on balance between humans and nature, short term and long term, speed and stability, private and public, women and men, equity and awards for achievement, and state and religion.</p> <p>The half of the book in chapter 3 is full of positive examples of many efforts to build a more sustainable world. They range from a regenerative, blue or circular economy, through energy, climate and urbanization, to the financial sector, investment, economics and alternatives to GDP. It explores collaboration and collective leadership, global governance, and examples of national action in China and Bhutan, closing with a short but excellent section on education for a sustainable civilization. It describes future education as active and collaborative, based on connectivity, value-based, focussed more on the topic of sustainability, fostering an integrated way of thinking and pluralism in content.</p> <p>With reference to values, it is worth quoting the whole paragraph. "Values represent the quintessence of human wisdom acquired over centuries. And in the new system that's developing, they must embody the fundamental principles for sustainable accomplishment, whether individual or social. These must be even more than the inspiring ideals that supply the energy needed to fulfil human aspirations. Values are a form of knowledge and a powerful determinant of human evolution. They are psychological skills that have profound <i>practical</i> importance. Education must be founded on values that promote sustainability and general well-being for all. A move toward inculcating sustainable values would amount to a paradigm change in our current society's value system. It would consider as its aim the greater well-being of both human and the natural systems on which they depend, rather than a valuation for more production and consumption. Conscious emphasis will be placed on values that are truly universal, as well as on respect for cultural differences. At the grass-roots level, the movement towards sustainability can build on deep local values. Values can create transformational leadership, leadership in thought that leads to action." (p. 198)</p> <p>The Club of Rome has built on its half-century of service to humanity with another important report to prepare us for the challenges ahead, and to inspire us to positive action.</p> <hr style="width: 100%; height: 2px;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <p><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" height="66" src="/gr/IEFlogo5.gif" width="142" /></p> <p><small>Last updated 13 September 2018</small></p> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-blog-comments field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> </section> Thu, 13 Sep 2018 21:28:44 +0000 Arthur Dahl 944 at http://iefworld.org